The Song of Roland

by

Anonymous

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Archbishop Turpin of Rheims Character Analysis

Archbishop Turpin of Rheims Quotes in The Song of Roland

The The Song of Roland quotes below are all either spoken by Archbishop Turpin of Rheims or refer to Archbishop Turpin of Rheims. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of The Song of Roland published in 1957.
Laisses 79–103 Quotes

Then to their side comes the Archbishop Turpin,
Riding his horse and up the hillside spurring.
He calls the French and preaches them a sermon:
“Barons, my lords, Charles picked us for this purpose;
We must be ready to die in our King’s service.
Christendom needs you, so help us to preserve it.
Battle you’ll have, of that you may be certain,
Here comes the Paynims—your own eyes have observed them.
Now beat your breasts and ask God for His mercy:
I will absolve you and set your souls in surety.
If you should die, blest martyrdom’s your guerdon;
You’ll sit on high in Paradise eternal.”
The French alight and all kneel down in worship;
God’s shrift and blessing the Archbishop conferreth,
And for their penance he bids them all strike firmly.

Page Number: 95
Explanation and Analysis:
Laisses 138–167 Quotes

Beyond his comrades, upon the grass-green plain,
There he beholds the noble baron laid,
The great Archbishop, vice-gerent of God’s name.
He beats his breast with eyes devoutly raised,
With folded hands lifted to Heaven he prays
That God will give him in Paradise a place.
Turpin is dead that fought for Charlemayn;
In mighty battles, and in preaching right brave,
Still against Paynims a champion of the Faith;
Blest mote he be, the Lord God give him grace!

Page Number: 137
Explanation and Analysis:
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Archbishop Turpin of Rheims Character Timeline in The Song of Roland

The timeline below shows where the character Archbishop Turpin of Rheims appears in The Song of Roland. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Laisses 53–78
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
Treachery vs. Chivalry Theme Icon
...Roland refuses to keep more than 20,000 men with him. Among these are Oliver, Archbishop Turpin, Count Walter Hum, and their knights. (full context)
Laisses 79–103
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Archbishop Turpin rides up the hill and addresses the Franks with a “sermon,” telling them, “Christendom needs... (full context)
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
Roland likewise kills Marsilion’s brother, Falsaron, and Turpin slays Corsablis, a king from Barbary. They deliver mocking insults over each corpse. Franks Gerin... (full context)
Laisses 104–127
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Amid the fray, Archbishop Turpin kills Siglorel, a “sorcerer, / who’d once been down to Hell,” with Jupiter for his... (full context)
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
...they must bravely wield Durendal and Hauteclaire. A notoriously vicious Saracen rides forward, prompting Archbishop Turpin to muse that the man “looks right heretic to me.” When Turpin strikes him down,... (full context)
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
...the French urge Roland, Oliver, and the Peers to flee for their lives, but Archbishop Turpin tells them to be strong, and that it would be better to die than retreat.... (full context)
Laisses 128–137
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
Treachery vs. Chivalry Theme Icon
Overhearing their quarrel, Archbishop Turpin intervenes, urging the men to set their differences aside—while it’s true that sounding the horn... (full context)
Laisses 138–167
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
...his aid. He enters the field again with his sword, Durendal, bent on revenge. Archbishop Turpin approves, remarking that unless a knight is fierce in battle, it’s better for him to... (full context)
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
When Roland recovers, he sees that all the French, except for Archbishop Turpin and Walter Hum, have died. At Walter’s urging, Roland begins fighting again, alongside the other... (full context)
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
...Emperor himself. Four hundred of the stoutest pagan warriors make a fresh assault on Roland, Turpin supporting him. Even though they know that Charlemayn is now on his way, the two... (full context)
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
...finally flee back to Spain, and Roland, unhorsed, can’t pursue them. Instead he bandages Archbishop Turpin’s wounds and then decides to find and identify the bodies of his fallen comrades. He... (full context)
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
After Roland finds Oliver’s body, he weeps tenderly and swoons once more. Turpin picks up Roland’s olifant and tries to walk to a nearby river to fetch some... (full context)
Laisses 203–226
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
The Ideal King Theme Icon
Loyalty, Honor, and Chivalry Theme Icon
...all the bishops, monks, and priests among the crowd conduct a funeral service. Only Roland, Turpin, and Oliver are not buried here; Charlemayn oversees the washing and wrapping of their bodies... (full context)
Laisses 265–291
Christianity vs. Paganism Theme Icon
The Ideal King Theme Icon
...a saint’s altar, as a relic for pilgrims. The bodies of Roland, Oliver, and Archbishop Turpin are laid to rest in St. Romayne’s at Blaye. Charlemayn continues on his way, not... (full context)