The Sorrows of Young Werther

Fiancé then husband to Lotte, and erstwhile friend to Werther. Albert is an amiable young man who likes Werther despite Werther’s obvious affection for Lotte. The two engage in hearty conversations often, but Werther’s increasing obsession with Lotte becomes a strain on their friendship. Things are brought to a head when the Farmer Lad murders the Widow out of lovestruck jealousy, and Werther defends the boy’s actions to Albert in a way bordering on insanity. The episode scares Albert, who sees strong parallels between the Lad’s obsession with the widow and Werther’s feelings for Lotte, and it causes an irreparable rift between him and Werther. Albert subsequently advises Lotte to see far less of Werther. Goethe based Albert on a man who was engaged to Goethe’s own love interest (and the woman who was the basis for Lotte), Charlotte Bluff. Bluff’s fiancé considered Goethe a genius whose passion could do with some restraint, and Albert seems to follow along in this vein as a sensible man ruled more by reason than emotion.

Albert Quotes in The Sorrows of Young Werther

The The Sorrows of Young Werther quotes below are all either spoken by Albert or refer to Albert. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of The Sorrows of Young Werther published in 1989.
Book 1: Jul 19-Aug 12, 1771 Quotes

I grind my teeth and mock my own misery…I go rambling in the woods, and if my walk takes me to Lotte's and I find Albert sitting in the summerhouse with her in the greenery, and I cannot bear it any more.

Related Characters: Werther (speaker), Lotte (Charlotte S.), Albert
Page Number: 57
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other The Sorrows of Young Werther quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!

True, it is wrong to steal: but if a man goes thieving to save himself and his family from starvation, are we to pity him or punish him? Who will first cast a stone if a husband sacrifices his unfaithful wife and her worthless seducer in the heat of his righteous wrath? or if a girl abandons herself for one joyful hour to the irresistible pleasures of love?

Related Characters: Werther (speaker), Albert
Page Number: 61
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Book 1: Oct 20, 1771-Feb 20, 1772 Quotes

Oh, it would drive me insane if she could forget—Albert, the very thought is hell.

Related Characters: Werther (speaker), Lotte (Charlotte S.), Albert
Page Number: 80
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Get the entire Sorrows of Young Werther LitChart as a printable PDF.
The sorrows of young werther.pdf.medium

Albert Character Timeline in The Sorrows of Young Werther

The timeline below shows where the character Albert appears in The Sorrows of Young Werther. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book One: June 16, 1771
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
...warned Werther, however, not to fall in love with Lotte: she was already engaged to Albert, of whom the aunt had spoken highly. Werther promptly forgot these sage words when he... (full context)
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
...but which Lotte claims her fiancé will be happy to give up to Werther, as Albert is not a good dancer. They continue dancing together even after this initial dance, earning... (full context)
Book One: July 8-19, 1771
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
...joy at his presence—all because he’s been around Lotte. Yet, Werther confesses, whenever Lotte mentions Albert (which, he notes, she always does in a warm, loving way), he begins to doubt... (full context)
Book One: July 19-August 12, 1771
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Finally, Albert arrives, and, in a fit, Werther resolves to leave. He likes Albert well enough, and... (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
...actually be living the best possible life if he weren’t thinking so foolishly about things. Albert, after all, is a quite enjoyable man—Werther even goes so far as to call him... (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
Directly after making this declaration, Werther describes a debate that he and Albert have recently engaged in on the topic of suicide. Albert holds that suicide is morally... (full context)
Book One: August 15-September 10, 1771
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Upper Class and Lower Class Theme Icon
August 28 is Werther’s birthday, and Lotte and Albert give him a pocket-edition of Homer that he can easily take with him on his... (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...stiffening of resolve is the result of a conversation that occurred between himself, Lotte, and Albert, on the subject of life after death. The topic impacted Werther deeply, and he resolves... (full context)
Book One: October 20, 1771-February 20, 1772
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
...on February 20, Werther again writes back to Wahlheim. This time he writes to congratulate Albert on his marriage to Lotte. The two married without telling Werther. Werther had previously decided... (full context)
Book Two: June 11-November 3, 1772
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...would be like if Lotte were his wife. She would be happier, he is sure: Albert lacks Werther’s emotional sensitivity, after all, and doesn’t share as deep a bond with Lotte.... (full context)
Book Two: Editorial Interlude
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...and additional sources as required. He reports that in the following days, those close to Albert, Lotte, and Werther found Albert and Lotte largely unchanged. Instead, Werther himself began to act... (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
...boy’s passion. The officer is not in the least persuaded by Werther’s argument, nor is Albert, who is also present. Albert offends Werther with his argument against the farmer lad. (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
Walking home from the scene, Albert advises Lotte that she needs to see less of Werther and that Werther’s too-friendly behavior... (full context)
Book Two: December 20-21, 1772
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...can only end badly. Werther takes her words to be remarks prepared for her by Albert and does not listen. (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...such matters. He then prepares to visit Lotte one final time, though before Christmas Eve. Albert is away on other business. (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...with all of them. She realizes that she has always thought she could keep both Albert and Werther. When Werther arrives, she is thrilled at his coming, but nevertheless chastises him... (full context)
The Heart vs. The Mind Theme Icon
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Women Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
...and leaves, returning home to add a final few passages to his suicide note. When Albert returns home, Lotte does not tell him what has taken place. (full context)
Book Two: December 21-22, 1772
Self-Absorption of Youth Theme Icon
Suicide Theme Icon
That night, Werther writes to Albert, requesting to borrow Albert’s pistols for a journey he’s planning to undertake. Lotte, who is... (full context)