The Stone Angel

by

Margaret Laurence

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Lottie Drieser Character Analysis

One of Hagar’s childhood friends. Lottie, teased as a young girl and called “No-Name” because her father abandoned her and her mother, eventually rises in Manawaka society to become the wife of the wealthy Telford Simmons. Lottie tries to warn Hagar not to take up with Bram, but Hagar ignores her advice. Later on, the two women reconnect when their children embark upon an affair—together, Lottie and Hagar conspire to stop Arlene and John from marrying, fearing that their children’s youthful foolishness will result in their eventual misery, though their plan backfires in ways that neither of them could have ever foreseen.

Lottie Drieser Quotes in The Stone Angel

The The Stone Angel quotes below are all either spoken by Lottie Drieser or refer to Lottie Drieser. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the University of Chicago Press edition of The Stone Angel published in 1964.
Chapter 1 Quotes

We saw a huge and staggering heap of eggs, jarred and broken by some wagoner and cast here, unsaleable. July was hot that day— I can feel yet its insistence upon my neck and my wringing palms. We saw, with a kind of horror that could not be avoided, however much one looked away or scurried on, that some of the eggs had been fertile and had hatched in the sun. The chicks, feeble, foodless, bloodied and mutilated, prisoned by the weight of broken shells all around them, were trying to crawl like little worms, their half-mouths opened uselessly among the garbage. I could only gawk and retch, I and the others, all except one. […]

[Lottie] looked at the chicks. I didn’t know whether she made herself look, or whether she was curious.

“We can’t leave them like this.”

“But Lottie—” that was Charlotte Tappen, who had an exceptionally weak stomach, even though her father was a doctor. “What can we do? I can’t look, or I’ll throw up.”

“Hagar—” Lottie began. “I wouldn’t touch them with a ten-foot pole,” I said. “All right,” Lottie said furiously. “Don’t, then.” She took a stick and crushed the eggshell skulls, and some of them she stepped on with the heels of her black patent-leather shoes.

It was the only thing to do, a thing I couldn’t have done. And yet it troubled me so much that I could not.

Related Characters: Hagar Shipley (speaker), Charlotte Tappen (speaker), Lottie Drieser (speaker)
Page Number: 27-28
Explanation and Analysis:
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Lottie Drieser Character Timeline in The Stone Angel

The timeline below shows where the character Lottie Drieser appears in The Stone Angel. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
...as a girl was Charlotte Tapper, and the other children in their small school included Lottie Drieser, whose father had left their family and disappeared, Telford Simmons, the son of the... (full context)
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Family, Love, and Resentment Theme Icon
...after his wife’s death, though Hagar accidentally learned that he was having an affair with Lottie Drieser’s mother when she spotted them together at the cemetery one afternoon. The woman died... (full context)
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
...bloodied” chicks had managed to hatch. Knowing the creatures would never live on their own, Lottie Drieser crushed the chicks with the heels of her boots while Hagar and Charlotte watched.... (full context)
Chapter 2
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Family, Love, and Resentment Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
...just outside town sometime. On her way out of the dance, Hagar was stopped by Lottie Drieser, who warned her that Bram was “common as dirt” and known to take up... (full context)
Chapter 4
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
...had come. When the girl’s mother came to the door, Hagar saw that it was Lottie Drieser, now married to Telford Simmons. After the awkward exchange, Hagar and John walked away,... (full context)
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Family, Love, and Resentment Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
...things—heirloom earrings, sterling silver candleholders, and fine china—and took them into town to sell to Lottie Drieser. She used the cash she got from the transaction to leave Manawaka on a... (full context)
Chapter 6
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Family, Love, and Resentment Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
...front steps of Currie’s General Store—John introduced the girl as Arlene Simmons, the daughter of Lottie and Telford. After Arlene walked away, Hagar inquired about the nature of their relationship—she overheard... (full context)
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
Another day in town, Hagar ran into Lottie on the street. Lottie said she was happy that Hagar had done well for herself... (full context)
Chapter 7
Choices and Identity Theme Icon
Womanhood Theme Icon
The next day, Hagar called upon Lottie to discuss the relationship between their children. Lottie seemed to be fairly happy for the... (full context)
Chapter 8
Memory and the Past Theme Icon
Hagar visited Lottie and Telford, but the visit was short, awkward, and painful for all of them. Over... (full context)