The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

by

Thomas S. Kuhn

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Boyle was a chemist who lived and worked in England and Ireland during the late 17th century. He was a believer in Descartes’s model of the world, and he used this paradigm to arrive at what is now known as Boyle’s Law: the volume of gas, he discovered, decreases as the pressure of gas increases (and vice versa).
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Robert Boyle Character Timeline in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

The timeline below shows where the character Robert Boyle appears in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3. The Nature of Normal Science
Normal Science vs. Extraordinary Science Theme Icon
...lists several examples of these kind of constants: there is Avogadro’s number in chemistry, or Boyle’s law in physics (both of which are named after the men who discovered them). (full context)
Chapter 11. The Invisibility of Revolutions
Linear Progress vs. Circular History Theme Icon
Perception and Truth Theme Icon
...to solve the same questions—the questions of whatever today’s paradigm is. Many textbooks praise Robert Boyle as the first modern chemist because he defined the term “element” much as today’s chemists... (full context)