The Talented Mr. Ripley

An expat, writer, and resident of Mongibello, Marge Sherwood is Dickie’s on-and-off romantic interest and Tom’s major rival for Dickie’s affections. Marge is creative and kind, but hopelessly lovesick for Dickie, and she often allows herself to be treated unfairly at his hands. When she senses an attachment between Tom and Dickie, she reveals her suspicions about Tom to Dickie, which creates a rift between the two men and leads Tom to resent Marge. After Tom murders Dickie, he returns to Mongibello and writes to Marge as Dickie, describing his need to distance himself from her so that he can ascertain how he really feels about her. As Marge and Tom correspond throughout the novel—with Tom alternately writing to her as Dickie and as himself—the text reveals Marge to be a sharp and rightly defensive woman whose strong moral compass and sure sense of intuition fall on deaf (or dead) ears.

Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood Quotes in The Talented Mr. Ripley

The The Talented Mr. Ripley quotes below are all either spoken by Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood or refer to Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Obsession, Identity, and Imitation Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the W. W. Norton & Company edition of The Talented Mr. Ripley published in 2008.
Chapter 9 Quotes

“And these—a lot of landscapes,” Dickie said with a deprecatory laugh, though obviously he wanted Tom to say something complimentary about them, because obviously he was proud of them. They were all wild and hasty and monotonously similar. “My surrealist effort,” Dickie said, bracing another canvas against his knee. Tom winced with almost a personal shame. It was Marge, undoubtedly, though with long snakelike hair, and worst of all two horizons in her eyes, with a miniature landscape of Mongibello’s houses and mountains in one eye, and the beach in the other full of little red people. “Yes, I like that,” Tom said. It gave Dickie something to do, just as it gave thousands of lousy amateur painters all over something to do. He was sorry that Dickie fell into this category as a painter, because he wanted Dickie to be much more.

Related Characters: Tom Ripley (speaker), Richard “Dickie” Greenleaf (speaker), Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood, Herbert Greenleaf, Emily Greenleaf
Page Number: 58
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 10 Quotes

He suddenly felt that Dickie was embracing her, or at least touching her, at this minute, and partly he wanted to see it, and partly he loathed the idea of seeing it. He turned and walked back to Marge’s gate. Tom stopped as Marge’s window came into view: Dickie’s arm was around her waist. Dickie was kissing her. Marge’s face was tipped up to Dickie’s, and what disgusted Tom was that he knew Dickie didn’t mean it. What disgusted him was the big bulge of her behind in the peasant skirt below Dickie’s arm that circled her waist. Tom turned away and ran down the steps, wanting to scream.

Related Characters: Tom Ripley, Richard “Dickie” Greenleaf, Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood
Related Symbols: Marge’s Underthings
Page Number: 74
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

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Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood Character Timeline in The Talented Mr. Ripley

The timeline below shows where the character Marjorie “Marge” Sherwood appears in The Talented Mr. Ripley. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3
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...album full of pictures of Dickie—one picture, taken in Italy, features an American woman named Marge Sherwood. Emily becomes emotional, and Tom promises to do “everything he can to make Dickie... (full context)
Chapter 6
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...He does not send these fanciful letters, which are full of somewhat lurid observations of Marge and Dickie’s relationship. He writes and sends a letter to his Aunt Dottie, “cutting himself... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...Tom purchases a bathing suit and heads to the water, where he spots Dickie and Marge. Tom introduces himself, but Dickie does not remember him from America. (full context)
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After a swim, Dickie invites Tom up to his house for lunch—Marge joins them. Tom and Dickie discuss Dickie’s parents, and Marge points out her house and... (full context)
Chapter 8
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From his hotel room, Tom, sick with an upset stomach, observes Dickie and Marge as they make their way down a nearby street. Tom “curses himself for being heavy-handed,”... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Dickie invites Tom to lunch, but first the two stop by Marge’s house to see if she is home—her home is “sloppy” with a “messy” garden out... (full context)
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...tour of the rest of the house, and notes that there is “no sign of Marge anywhere, least of all in Dickie’s bedroom.” (full context)
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Tom suggests he and Dickie go to Naples. Dickie tells him that he and Marge are planning to go on Saturday evening, but Tom, “hoping to avoid Marge in the... (full context)
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...and the two drunkenly help a woman home in a taxi. Tom remarks that if Marge were with them, they “wouldn’t be seeing half of Rome.” Dickie agrees enthusiastically, and puts... (full context)
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The next day, Tom and Dickie return to Mongibello. Marge is “annoyed” with Dickie for staying out without telling her. Tom keeps his mouth shut,... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...into Dickie’s house.” Over the course of the few days after the trip to Rome, Marge makes herself scarce, and is “cool” toward both Tom and Dickie when they see her... (full context)
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Dickie goes up to Marge’s house, hoping to reassure her and to invite her to Cortina. Tom follows him in... (full context)
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...of his outfit. Tom tries to act casual, asking Dickie if he’s made up with Marge. Dickie insists that he and Marge are “fine,” and then tells Tom “clearly” that he... (full context)
Chapter 11
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Tom heads home while Dickie goes off to visit Marge. On the way back to the house, Tom stops and retrieves a letter from the... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Marge declines Tom and Dickie’s invitation to San Remo, but asks them to pick up a... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Stepping off the bus in Mongibello, Tom immediately runs into Marge, dressed in her bathing suit. She asks where Dickie is, and Tom replies that Dickie... (full context)
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Marge leaves to go to the beach, and Tom sets upon Dickie’s things. He dresses himself... (full context)
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The following morning, as Tom finishes up the packing, Marge stops by. Tom tells her that he’s received a letter from Dickie stating Dickie’s intent... (full context)
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Once in Rome, Tom writes Marge a letter from “Dickie,” explaining that “he” doesn’t want to see Marge for a while... (full context)
Chapter 14
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...Tom moves hotels. In his new room, he holds “imaginary conversations” with Fausto, Freddie, and Marge—practicing his imitation of Dickie, in case any one of them calls him on the phone.... (full context)
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...he is Dickie Greenleaf.” He collects Dickie’s mail at American Express—there is a letter from Marge, in which she denounces Tom, telling Dickie she believes Tom is “using” him, has a... (full context)
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When Tom returns to Rome, a letter from Marge is waiting, saying that she is departing Europe in early March and plans to send... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...Tom’s. Tom returns to his room, after finding out that he’s missed a call from Marge while out. Tom sits in a chair, smoking and chastising himself for choosing Rome as... (full context)
Chapter 18
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The next morning, Tom wakes up thinking of Marge. He has a “horrible premonition” that she is bound for Rome. The phone rings—there are... (full context)
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The phone rings, and Tom answers it—it’s Marge. He tells her that he is getting dressed and Dickie is out at the police... (full context)
Chapter 19
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Tom considers writing a letter to Marge telling her that he and Dickie are “very happy together.” He amuses himself at the... (full context)
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The next morning there is a letter from Marge to Dickie, asking him to “admit that he can’t live without his little chum,” and... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...is “not very cooperative,” but couldn’t possibly have murdered Freddie Miles. The tenente asks about Marge, and Tom implies that both Dickie and Freddie were in love with her. After a... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...Herbert stating that he “feels Dickie may have killed himself.” He receives a letter from Marge—who is in Munich—declining a previous invitation to visit Venice, and stating that she “does not... (full context)
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...Latta-Cacciaguerra. At each party, people ask him incessantly about Dickie—whether he was in love with Marge, and what could possibly have happened to him. (full context)
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Each day, Tom awaits a letter from Marge or Herbert—he feels prepared to see them both and to answer any questions they might... (full context)
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One day in early April, Tom receives a call from Marge. She is at the railway station in Venice; Herbert is behind in Rome. When she... (full context)
Chapter 24
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...vaguely possible that Dickie has killed himself. Tom invites Herbert to Venice, but he declines. Marge and two of Tom’s friends, in order to amuse themselves, bat about the idea that... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...has changed his mind and will be arriving in Venice just before noon. Tom and Marge have a coffee and read the papers. It is a rare morning; nothing about Dickie... (full context)
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Back at Tom’s house, Tom urges Marge to head upstairs so that he and Herbert can speak alone—he knows Herbert will want... (full context)
Chapter 26
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Marge insists that Tom accompany her to an afternoon cocktail party, though he feels that they... (full context)
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At dinner with Marge and Herbert, Tom tries to make up for his distant behavior at the party by... (full context)
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Marge enters the room holding a brown leather box containing Dickie’s rings, which she discovered when... (full context)
Chapter 27
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In the morning, Tom overhears Marge beginning to tell Herbert about the rings over the phone. When she hangs up, she... (full context)
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Marge and Tom go over to Herbert’s hotel, where he and the American detective, McCarron, are... (full context)
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...over the facts of Dickie’s “disappearance” again, including the forgeries and the intricacies of Tom, Marge, and Dickie’s friendship. McCarron then asks Tom to accompany him downstairs. Tom panics on the... (full context)
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...McCarron, but it never comes. Tom decides that he won’t worry about any “trouble” from Marge, reassuring himself that she will “arrange everything in her dull imagination” to accept the idea... (full context)