The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

by

Anne Brontë

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Frederick Lawrence Character Analysis

The owner of Wildfell Hall. In the first half of the novel, told from Gilbert Markham’s perspective, it would seem that Frederick Lawrence is the secret lover of Helen Graham—but in reality, he is her brother. He is also the romantic target of Jane Wilson, who hopes to marry him for his money and station. When Frederick finally becomes aware of Jane’s true materialistic character, he abandons her for the much worthier Esther Hargrave.

Frederick Lawrence Quotes in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The The Tenant of Wildfell Hall quotes below are all either spoken by Frederick Lawrence or refer to Frederick Lawrence. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Wordsworth Classics edition of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall published in 2001.
Chapter 10 Quotes

You see what it is for women to affect to be different to other people.

Page Number: 70
Explanation and Analysis:
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Frederick Lawrence Character Timeline in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The timeline below shows where the character Frederick Lawrence appears in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1. A Discovery
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...and Richard is a serious young student hoping to enter college. Finally, Gilbert writes of Frederick Lawrence, a young and wealthy squire and the owner of Wildfell Hall who now lives... (full context)
Chapter 4. The Party
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...first letter—Eliza, Mary, and the Reverend Milward;  Jane, Richard, Robert, and Mrs. Wilson; and Mr. Lawrence—have come to the Markhams to join Gilbert, Fergus, Rose, and Mrs. Markham for the house... (full context)
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...moderation is the most sensible approach to take to the question of consumption, but Mr. Lawrence defends Helen’s side, suggesting that if a person is genetically disposed to intemperance, it might... (full context)
Chapter 6. Progression
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Gilbert then runs into Mr. Lawrence, and, without ever saying so directly, the two men admit to each other that they... (full context)
Chapter 7. The Excursion
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...Eliza Millward; Richard Wilson; and Arthur (Jr.) and Helen Graham. Gilbert tried to persuade Mr. Lawrence to come, but he declined when he heard Helen would be there. Gilbert thinks his... (full context)
Chapter 9. A Snake in the Grass
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...and informs the company that she has heard that little Arthur is, in fact, Mr. Lawrence’s son. Gilbert is horrified by the pettiness of his companions and steadfastly disbelieves the rumor.... (full context)
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While in the garden, Gilbert sees Jane Wilson and Mr. Lawrence having an intense conversation, which Gilbert assumes is about Helen and the rumor circulating about... (full context)
Chapter 10. A Contract and a Quarrel
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Leaving, Gilbert runs into Mr. Lawrence, also on his way to Wildfell Hall. Gilbert accosts his former friend, demanding to know... (full context)
Chapter 12. A Tete-a-Tete and a Discovery
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...glimpse of his beloved. What he finds instead is her taking the air with Mr. Lawrence. Gilbert overhears Helen saying that she needs to move away—she cannot be happy in this... (full context)
Chapter 14. An Assault
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...town on a gloomy morning after breakfast. On the road, he meets up with Mr. Lawrence, who begins chatting with him about the business and the weather. Gilbert is taken aback... (full context)
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Gilbert then rides on, trying not to think of Lawrence, but his conscience gets the better of him and he returns to the scene, finding... (full context)
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 At home, Rose and Mrs. Markham have heard that Mr. Lawrence was thrown from his horse and brought to his house on the verge of death.... (full context)
Chapter 15. An Encounter and Its Consequences
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...the worst of her. Gilbert tells her about seeing her in the garden with Mr. Lawrence. Helen grows excited upon hearing his story, and places a large volume in his hands.... (full context)
Chapter 41. 'Hope Springs Eternal in the Human Breast'
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...of her brother’s visit, which was enjoyable and relaxing but too brief. She loved having Frederick’s company and watching him get better acquainted with little Arthur. They talked of her plan... (full context)
Chapter 43. The Boundary Past
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Helen also writes to Frederick, asking him to get rooms ready at Wildfell Hall. It is difficult for her to... (full context)
Chapter 44. The Retreat
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...cheerful frame of mind, and that continues during her first two weeks’ stay at Wildfell. Frederick has helped her furnish the rooms and provides her with painting supplies. They all get... (full context)
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...and bad conduct. Helen learns that Arthur has been pressuring Helen’s friends and family, particularly Frederick, to tell him where she is. He doesn’t want her back—he wants little Arthur—but Helen... (full context)
Chapter 45. Reconciliation
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...says no, they will hear of each other through her brother. At the mention of Frederick Lawrence, Gilbert is overcome with shame. Helen still doesn’t know of their meeting on the... (full context)
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...after she is settled six months in another home, Gilbert may write to her through Frederick. The six-month delay is to act as both a cooling-off period and a test. If... (full context)
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...and worrying about Helen, alone at Wildfell Hall, doing the same. He decides to visit Frederick Lawrence and apologize for his violent behavior. When he gets to Woodford, Frederick’s estate, a... (full context)
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Frederick is especially pleased that Gilbert has promised not to see Helen anymore. As her brother,... (full context)
Chapter 46. Friendly Counsels
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...He becomes misanthropic and irritable with everyone, wanting only the society of his mother and Frederick Lawrence. The latter he visits as often as he can. He grows to like Helen’s... (full context)
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Frederick tells Gilbert that he has been to see Helen and that, while she is not... (full context)
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Frederick is offended at first, both by Gilbert’s presumption and then by the charges Gilbert lays... (full context)
Chapter 47. Startling Intelligence
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...heard it. Eliza says she came by the information thanks to a maid working at Frederick Lawrence’s estate. Gilbert immediately takes off for Woodford to ask Frederick if there is any... (full context)
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...returned home to nurse him. The governess, Miss Myers, apparently left him some time ago. Frederick has a letter explaining Helen’s situation, and Gilbert snatches it from his hand. In the... (full context)
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...to health he will agree to any proposal of hers. Helen ends her letter to Frederick saying she will continue to do her duty, even though it brings her no joy... (full context)
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When Gilbert finishes reading the letter, Frederick asks him what he makes of it. Gilbert wishes Helen weren’t wasting her time nursing... (full context)
Chapter 48. Further Intelligence
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Frederick receives another letter from Helen and visits Gilbert in order to share its contents with... (full context)
Chapter 49. Untitled
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...crashing down with a great roar. Gilbert writes to Halford of his steady friendship with Frederick, which is founded in no small part on Gilbert’s need to hear news of Helen.... (full context)
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...be with him, and now it seems that that is exactly what is happening. Later Frederick hands him another letter, in which Helen writes of Arthur’s death. Agonizing and drawn out,... (full context)
Chapter 50. Doubts and Disappointments
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...man who made her life a torment, but he does feel for Arthur. He and Frederick talk about the funeral. Frederick has been preparing for his journey while Gilbert read Helen’s... (full context)
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When Frederick returns, he says only that Helen was exhausted from her efforts. There is no talk... (full context)
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...Helen is at Staningley, he cannot write to her—he must wait until she returns home. Frederick joins his family at Staningley and then on a trip to the seaside. When he... (full context)
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Gilbert can sense that Frederick is trying to give him an opportunity to send a message to Helen, but Gilbert... (full context)
Chapter 51. A Strange Occurrence
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...where a wedding is indeed taking place—not between Helen and Walter, but between Esther and Frederick. Frederick is as shocked to see Gilbert as Gilbert is to see his friend, but... (full context)
Chapter 52. Fluctuations
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...a rich woman. It comes out in the course of conversation that they both asked Frederick about the other quite often, but that he did not communicate this fact to either... (full context)