The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

by

Anne Brontë

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Ralph Hattersley Character Analysis

An uncouth man, this son of a banker marries Milicent Hargrave because he claims he could not stand a wife who would check his desire to please himself at all times. At first one of Arthur Huntingdon’s most immoral and irresponsible friends, he later reforms, determined to be worthy of Milicent and a good father to their two children.

Ralph Hattersley Quotes in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The The Tenant of Wildfell Hall quotes below are all either spoken by Ralph Hattersley or refer to Ralph Hattersley. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Gender, Sexism, and Double Standards Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Wordsworth Classics edition of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall published in 2001.
Chapter 32 Quotes

“A man must have something to grumble about; and if he can't complain that his wife harries him to death with her perversity and ill-humour, he must complain that she wears him out with her kindness and gentleness.”

“But why complain at all, unless, because you are tired and dissatisfied?”

“To excuse my own failings, to be sure. Do you think I'll bear all the burden of my sins on my own shoulders, as long as there's another ready to help me, with none of her own to carry?”

Related Characters: Ralph Hattersley (speaker), Milicent Hargrave
Page Number: 227
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile
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Ralph Hattersley Character Timeline in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The timeline below shows where the character Ralph Hattersley appears in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 25. First Absence
Gender, Sexism, and Double Standards Theme Icon
Love and Marriage Theme Icon
...his best to forget her. He also passes along some gossip about Milicent. His friend Hattersley is determined to marry within the year, but he needs a woman who will let... (full context)
Gender, Sexism, and Double Standards Theme Icon
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...soon receives a letter from Milicent informing her that she is indeed engaged to Mr. Hattersley. Milicent can’t really believe the situation herself. She thought she’d given her potential suitor a... (full context)
Gender, Sexism, and Double Standards Theme Icon
Love and Marriage Theme Icon
...Helen to write to her and tell her something good about her fiancé. Maybe Mr. Hattersley is a diamond in the rough? Helen is distraught. She can offer no encouragement beyond... (full context)
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...else they should invite. Arthur suggests Grimsby, and Helen agrees, even though she hates him. Hattersley, Arthur says, will be too busy with his bride to care about shooting. (full context)
Chapter 30. Domestic Scenes
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...a wonder such living didn’t kill him. He wishes that she were more like Milicent. Hattersley’s wife is perfect, Arthur argues—she lets him do exactly as he pleases and never complains.... (full context)
Chapter 31. Social Virtues
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What follows is for Helen and Milicent a mortifying scene. Arthur, Hattersley, and Grimsby grow increasingly drunk and unruly. They attempt to force Lord Lowborough to drink,... (full context)
Chapter 32. Comparisons: Information Rejected
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...for love. This worries Milicent, who allowed romantic feelings to influence her decision to marry Hattersley. Helen assumes that Milicent is concerned about Esther because of her own unhappy match. (full context)
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...picks up on Milicent’s opinion that Arthur is, in many ways, a worse case than Hattersley, and, far from being offended, Helen agrees with her. She does worry, though, that Hattersley... (full context)
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Eventually they go back to the house, and Hattersley comes to visit with his daughter. She loves her father, but he roughhouses with her... (full context)
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Milicent leaves the room to straighten her hair (Hattersley mussed it when he hugged her), and Hattersley continues to grouse in a casual manner... (full context)
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Hattersley insists that he’d be a better man if he had a wife like Helen to... (full context)
Chapter 33. Two Evenings
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...tenderly congratulates her, and she rejects his tenderness. He then inquires after Arthur and Annabella. Hattersley tells him Arthur is out walking with Grimsby and Annabella with her husband. Walter, though,... (full context)
Chapter 38. The Injured Man
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...her. He realizes that she too has suffered in the knowledge of their spouses’ infidelities. Hattersley interrupts them, saying he knows just the thing to make Lowborough feel better: a duel... (full context)
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...but still very grieved. In the hall, Helen finds Arthur laughing at the situation, and Hattersley and Grimsby annoyed that the duel won’t be taking place. She continues to the drawing... (full context)
Chapter 39. A Scheme of Escape
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...no one has before, and he is shocked. He says he worships her. Then Arthur, Hattersley, and Grimsby burst in. Arthur has a gun. He sarcastically invites Walter to come hunting... (full context)
Chapter 42. A Reformation
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...is enjoying the company of Milicent and her children, as well as Esther and Mr. Hattersley. Hattersley seems determined to reform, to become a sober and responsible father, and to remove... (full context)
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Helen produces two letters from Milicent and hands them to Hattersley. The first letter covers one of Hattersley’s drunken periods with his friends, and the other... (full context)
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...to be completely happy, thanks to her husband’s new attitude. Helen knows, of course, that Hattersley has had little to tempt him during this time. It is her greatest wish that... (full context)
Chapter 49. Untitled
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Arthur’s condition continues to deteriorate. He is not friendless, however. Hattersley comes to see him and is a very attentive friend. Milicent comes with him, and... (full context)
Chapter 50. Doubts and Disappointments
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Gilbert takes this moment to acquaint Halford with the fates of Lady Lowborough, Lord Lowborough, Hattersley, and Grimsby. Lady Lowborough, it seems, eloped with a roguish gentleman. They fought and parted,... (full context)