The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

by

Anne Brontë

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The Tenant of Wildfell Hall Quotes

Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Wordsworth Classics edition of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall published in 2001.
Chapter 1 Quotes

“No matter, my dear,” said I; “it is what every respectable female ought to know; and besides, though you are alone now, you will not be always so; you have been married and probably—I might say almost certainly—will be again.” “You are mistaken there, ma'am,” said she, almost haughtily; “I am certain I never shall.” “But I told her, I knew better.”

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Mrs. Markham (speaker)
Page Number: 13
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“I would rather admire you from this distance, fair lady, than be the partner of your home.”

Related Characters: Gilbert Markham (speaker), Helen Graham, Eliza Millward
Page Number: 14
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Chapter 3 Quotes

I have not yet said that a boy should be ought to rush into the snares of life—or even willfully to seek temptation for the sake of exercising his virtue by overcoming it; I only say that it is better to arm and strengthen your hero, than to disarm and enfeeble the foe; and if you were to rear an oak sapling in a hothouse, tending it carefully night and day, and shielding it from every breath of wind, you could not expect it to become a hardy tree, like that which has grown up on the mountainside, exposed to all the action of the elements, and not even sheltered from the shock of the tempest.

Related Symbols: Trees and Flowers
Page Number: 26
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Well then, it must be that you think they are both weakened and prone to err, and the slightest error, the merest shadow of pollution will ruin the one, while the character of the other will be strengthened and embellished—his education properly finished by a little practical acquaintance with forbidden things. Such experience, to him (to use a trite simile), will be like the storm to the oak which, though it may scatter the leaves, and snap the smaller branches, serves but to rivet the roots, and to harden and condense the fibres of the tree. You would have us encourage our sons to prove all things by their own experience,

while our daughters must not even profit by the experience of others.

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Gilbert Markham
Page Number: 27
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Chapter 6 Quotes

Then you must fall each into your proper place. You’ll do your business, and she, if she’s worthy of you, will do hers; but it's your business to please yourself, and hers to please you.

Related Characters: Mrs. Markham (speaker), Gilbert Markham
Page Number: 46
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Chapter 7 Quotes

You’re not fit to associate with ladies and gentlemen, like us, that have nothing to do but to run snooking about to our neighbours’ houses, peeping into their private corners; and scenting out their secrets, and picking holes in their coats, when we don't find them ready made to our hands—you don’t understand such refined sources of enjoyment.

Page Number: 47
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Chapter 10 Quotes

You see what it is for women to affect to be different to other people.

Page Number: 70
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Chapter 15 Quotes

“I can crush that bold spirit,” thought I. But while I secretly exulted in my power, I felt disposed to dally with my victim like a cat.

Related Characters: Gilbert Markham (speaker), Helen Graham
Page Number: 99
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Chapter 16 Quotes

Because, I imagine there must be only a very, very few men in the world, that I should like to marry; and of those few, it is ten to one I may never be acquainted with one; or if I should, it is twenty to one, he may not happen to be single, or to take a fancy to me.

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Mrs. Maxwell (Peggy)
Page Number: 103
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It is not indeed, to be supposed that you would wish to marry anyone, till you were asked: a girl's affections should never be won unsought. But when they are sought—when the citadel of the heart is fairly besieged, it is apt to surrender sooner than the owner is aware of, and often against her better judgement, and in opposition to all her preconceived ideas of what she could have loved, unless she be extremely careful and discreet.

Related Characters: Mrs. Maxwell (Peggy) (speaker), Helen Graham
Page Number: 103
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First study; then approve; then love. Let your eyes be blind to all external attractions, your ears deaf to all the fascinations of flattery and light discourse—These are nothing—and worse than nothing—snares and wiles of the tempter, to lure the thoughtless to their own destruction. Principle is the first thing, after all; and next to that good sense, respectability, and moderate wealth. If you should marry the handsomest and most accomplished and superficially agreeable man in the world, you little know the misery that would overwhelm you, if, after all, you should find him to be a worthless reprobate, or even an impracticable fool.

Related Characters: Mrs. Maxwell (Peggy) (speaker), Helen Graham
Page Number: 104
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I have consulted her; and I know her wishes coincide with yours; but in such important matters, I take the liberty of judging for myself; and no persuasion can alter my inclinations, or induce me to believe that such a step would be conducive to my happiness, or yours—and I wonder that a man of your experience and discretion should think of choosing such a wife.

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Mrs. Maxwell (Peggy), Mr. Boarham
Page Number: 111
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Chapter 17 Quotes

I have such confidence in him, aunt, notwithstanding all you say, that I would willingly risk my happiness for the chance of securing his. I will leave better men to those who only consider their own advantage. If he has done amiss, I shall consider my life well spent in saving him from the consequences of his early errors, and striving to recall him to the path of virtue—God grant me success!

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Arthur Huntingdon, Mrs. Maxwell (Peggy)
Page Number: 118
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Chapter 22 Quotes

There is no help for him now; he is past praying for. Besides, she may keep up the deception to the end of the chapter; and then he will be just as happy in the illusion as if it were reality.

Page Number: 155
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I cannot get him to write or speak in real, solid earnest. I don't much mind it now; but if it be always so, what shall I do with the serious part of myself?

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Arthur Huntingdon
Page Number: 157
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Chapter 27 Quotes

She is a daughter of earth; you are an angel of heaven; only be not too austere in your divinity, and remember that I am a poor, fallible mortal.

Page Number: 185
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Chapter 30 Quotes

How little real sympathy there exists between us; how many of my thoughts and feelings are gloomily cloistered within my own mind; how much of my higher and better self is indeed unmarried—doomed either to harden and sour in the sunless shade of solitude, or to quite degenerate and fall away for lack of nutriment in this unwholesome soil!

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Arthur Huntingdon
Related Symbols: Trees and Flowers
Page Number: 191
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But it is now January: spring is approaching; and, I repeat, I dread the consequences of its arrival. That sweet season, I once so joyously welcomed as the time of hope and gladness, awakens, now, far other anticipations by its return.

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Arthur Huntingdon
Related Symbols: The Weather
Page Number: 208
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Chapter 32 Quotes

“A man must have something to grumble about; and if he can't complain that his wife harries him to death with her perversity and ill-humour, he must complain that she wears him out with her kindness and gentleness.”

“But why complain at all, unless, because you are tired and dissatisfied?”

“To excuse my own failings, to be sure. Do you think I'll bear all the burden of my sins on my own shoulders, as long as there's another ready to help me, with none of her own to carry?”

Related Characters: Ralph Hattersley (speaker), Milicent Hargrave
Page Number: 227
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Chapter 37 Quotes

“There is another life both for you and for me,” said I. “If it be the will of God that we should sow in tears, now, it is only that we may reap in joy, hereafter.”

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Walter Hargrave
Page Number: 263
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Chapter 38 Quotes

Two years hence you will be as calm as I am now—and far, far happier, I trust, for you are a man, and free to act as you please.

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Lord Lowborough
Page Number: 268
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Chapter 39 Quotes

“I do not insult you,” cried he: “I worship you. You are my angel—my divinity! I lay my powers at your feet—and you must and shall accept them!” he exclaimed impetuously, starting to his feet—"I will be your consoler and defender! And if your conscience upbraid you for it, say I overcame you and you could not choose but yield!”

Related Characters: Walter Hargrave (speaker), Helen Graham
Page Number: 279
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Chapter 45 Quotes

“It gives me little consolation to think I shall next behold you as a disembodied spirit, or an altered being, with a frame perfect and glorious, but not like this! —and a heart, perhaps, entirely estranged from me.”

“No, Gilbert, there is perfect love in Heaven!”

“So perfect, I suppose, that it soars above distinctions, and you will have no closer sympathy with me than with any one of the ten thousand angels and the innumerable multitude of happy spirits round us.”

Related Characters: Helen Graham (speaker), Gilbert Markham (speaker)
Page Number: 316
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