The Thing Around Your Neck

by

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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In "Jumping Monkey Hill," Edward is a British man who received a degree from Oxford in African Literature. He runs the writers' conference at Jumping Monkey Hill and seeks to discover stories that speak to the "real Africa." He's pretentious, insists on European dining customs that offend the African attendees, and makes suggestive comments to the female writers.

Edward Quotes in The Thing Around Your Neck

The The Thing Around Your Neck quotes below are all either spoken by Edward or refer to Edward. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Anchor Books edition of The Thing Around Your Neck published in 2009.
Jumping Monkey Hill Quotes

"Which Africa?"

Related Characters: Ujunwa (speaker), The Senegalese, The Ugandan, Edward
Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:
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Edward Character Timeline in The Thing Around Your Neck

The timeline below shows where the character Edward appears in The Thing Around Your Neck. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Jumping Monkey Hill
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...teas and cobblestone paths. She'll learn later that the organizer, an elderly British man named Edward Campbell, spent time there when he was a lecturer at the University of Cape Town. (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
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Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
Edward picks Ujunwa up at the airport. He offers pleasantries about Ujunwa's flight and asks if... (full context)
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
The Ugandan sits in the front of the car and Ujunwa worries that Edward is driving too fast. At the resort, Ujunwa and the other participants learn that there... (full context)
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
After the participants eat dinner, Edward addresses them. He mentions the British foundation funding the workshop and lays out the structure:... (full context)
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Family and Lies Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
At dinner that night, Edward tells all the participants to try the ostrich dish. Ujunwa says that she didn't know... (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
Over the course of the workshop, Ujunwa tries not to notice that Edward never looks at her face; instead he concentrates on the rest of her body. One... (full context)
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Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Family and Lies Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
Ujunwa reads the Zimbabwean's story and the participants talk about it the next day. Edward deems the story passé, and Ujunwa wonders how he can think that when the story... (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...Hill look at the black participants with suspicion. Ujunwa feels angry at the way that Edward leers at her, and she bursts out that Edward is always looking at her. The... (full context)
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Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...Tanzanian reads his story the next day. It's about the killings in the Congo, and Edward exclaims that it is urgent, relevant, and will be the selected story from the workshop.... (full context)
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Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...the next morning, nervous about having to read her story out loud later. At breakfast, Edward makes suggestive remarks to the Senegalese. Later, Ujunwa asks the Senegalese how she handled Edward's... (full context)
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The South African says that Edward means no harm, and Ujunwa attacks his attitude, saying that that kind of attitude is... (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
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...it strong. The South African compliments the realistic portrayal of women's lives in Nigeria, but Edward says that the story can't possibly be real since the most powerful Nigerian cabinet minister... (full context)