The Thing Around Your Neck

by

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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The Senegalese Character Analysis

In "Jumping Monkey Hill," the Senegalese is a young francophone woman attending the writers' conference at Jumping Monkey Hill. She's the youngest attendee and writes an autobiographical story about coming out to her parents as lesbian. She's astounded and offended when Edward says the story is implausible and not representative of Africa, but she doesn't think it's worth saying anything about Edward's inappropriate comments.

The Senegalese Quotes in The Thing Around Your Neck

The The Thing Around Your Neck quotes below are all either spoken by The Senegalese or refer to The Senegalese. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Anchor Books edition of The Thing Around Your Neck published in 2009.
Jumping Monkey Hill Quotes

"Which Africa?"

Related Characters: Ujunwa (speaker), The Senegalese, The Ugandan, Edward
Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Senegalese Character Timeline in The Thing Around Your Neck

The timeline below shows where the character The Senegalese appears in The Thing Around Your Neck. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Jumping Monkey Hill
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...Jumping Monkey Hill. Edward introduces the eight participants. Ujunwa studies them and decides the young Senegalese woman is probably her best bet for a friend, and thinks that she doesn't like... (full context)
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Family and Lies Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...explains that it's an African staple. Ujunwa drinks two glasses of wine, chats with the Senegalese woman, and doesn't enjoy her orange chicken. (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Family and Lies Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...They discuss African literature and the racism they experience at the hands of Europeans. The Senegalese woman says she's writing her own story about coming out to her parents as lesbian,... (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Family and Lies Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...that when the story itself is so very true. The next day, they workshop the Senegalese's story. Edward says that homosexual stories aren't reflective of Africa. Ujunwa asks "which Africa?" Edward... (full context)
Women, Marriage, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Stories and Representation  Theme Icon
Colonialism and Violence Theme Icon
...to read her story out loud later. At breakfast, Edward makes suggestive remarks to the Senegalese. Later, Ujunwa asks the Senegalese how she handled Edward's remarks, and she shrugs and says... (full context)