The Three Day Blow

Marjorie (“Marge”) Character Analysis

Nick’s ex-girlfriend. Although Marjorie is not physically present in the story, Nick and Bill talk about her as they drink, and she consumes Nick’s thoughts. Nick called off his relationship with Marge because he was hesitant about committing to the social demands of married life, such as having to see her mother all the time. Bill thinks marriage “ruins” men and is adamant that Nick did the right thing by avoiding an engagement. And although Nick says he agrees, internally he is heartbroken. When Bill cautions Nick against getting mixed up with Marjorie again, Nick suddenly realizes that their breakup perhaps wasn’t as final as he thought. Buoyed by this new hope, Nick secretly vows to go into town next week, presumably to visit Marjorie and see if he can make amends.

Marjorie (“Marge”) Quotes in The Three Day Blow

The The Three Day Blow quotes below are all either spoken by Marjorie (“Marge”) or refer to Marjorie (“Marge”). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Simon and Schuster edition of The Three Day Blow published in 1987.
The Three-Day Blow Quotes

“You were very wise, Wemedge,” Bill said.

“What do you mean?” asked Nick.

“To bust off that Marge business,” Bill said.

Related Characters: Nick (speaker), Bill (speaker), Marjorie (“Marge”)
Page Number: 90
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

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“Once a man’s married he’s absolutely bitched […] He hasn't got anything more. Nothing. Not a damn thing. He’s done for. You’ve seen the guys that get married. […] They get this sort of fat married look. They're done for.”

Related Characters: Bill (speaker), Nick, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Page Number: 90
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

“If you’d have married her you would have had to marry the whole family. Remember her mother and that guy she married […] Imagine having them around the house all the time and going to Sunday dinners at their house, and having them over to dinner and her telling Marge all the time what to do and how to act.”

Related Characters: Bill (speaker), Nick, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Page Number: 90
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

“You can't mix oil and water and you can't mix that sort of thing any more than if I'd marry Ida that works for Strattons. She'd probably like it, too.”

Related Characters: Bill (speaker), Nick, Marjorie (“Marge”), Ida
Page Number: 90-91
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Nick said nothing. The liquor had all died out of him and left him alone. Bill wasn't there. He wasn't sitting in front of the fire or going fishing tomorrow with Bill and his dad or anything. He wasn't drunk. It was all gone. All he knew was that he had once had Marjorie and that he had lost her. She was gone and he had sent her away. That was all that mattered. He might never see her again. Probably he never would. It was all gone, finished.

Page Number: 91
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

“All of a sudden everything was over […] I don't know why it was. I couldn't help it. Just like when the three-day blows come now and rip all the leaves off the trees.”

Related Characters: Nick (speaker), Bill, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Related Symbols: The Storm
Page Number: 91
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

“I'm sorry as hell about her but what could I do? […] You know what her mother was like!”

Related Characters: Nick (speaker), Bill, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Page Number: 92
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Nick had not thought about that. It had seemed so absolute. That was a thought. That made him feel better […] He felt happy now. There was not anything that was irrevocable.

Related Characters: Nick, Bill, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Page Number: 92
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

“There's always a chance.”

Related Characters: Nick (speaker), Bill, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Page Number: 92
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Outside now the Marge business was no longer so tragic. It was not even very important. The wind blew everything like that away. […] None of it was important now. The wind blew it out of his head.

Related Characters: Nick, Bill, Marjorie (“Marge”)
Related Symbols: The Storm
Page Number: 92
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
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Marjorie (“Marge”) Character Timeline in The Three Day Blow

The timeline below shows where the character Marjorie (“Marge”) appears in The Three Day Blow. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
The Three-Day Blow
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
The Lost Generation Theme Icon
...abruptly, saying that Nick was “wise” to break off his relationship, dismissively calling it “that Marge business.” Nick tepidly agrees, responding “I guess so,” but he goes quiet and says nothing... (full context)
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
...business “ruin” him. Eager to prove his point, Bill reminds Nick that if he’d married Marjorie, the whole family would be around all the time, interfering with their lives, especially Marjorie’s... (full context)
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
Loss and Hope Theme Icon
...overcome with a palpable sense of loss. He is heartbroken that he broke up with Marjorie, and that he might never see her again. He repeatedly thinks to himself with despair,... (full context)
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
Loss and Hope Theme Icon
The Lost Generation Theme Icon
Bill remarks that if Nick had stayed with Marjorie, they wouldn’t be hanging out right now. Nick agrees, thinking to himself that he would... (full context)
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
Nick’s thoughts despondently dwell on all the things he had planned to do with Marjorie, like travel to Italy, and internally he is riddled with grief. Bill admits that he... (full context)
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
The Lost Generation Theme Icon
Nick bursts out that he’s “sorry as hell about [Marjorie]” but that he had no choice, adding with frustration, “you know what her mother was... (full context)
Masculinity, Independence, and Vulnerability Theme Icon
Loss and Hope Theme Icon
The Lost Generation Theme Icon
...into the storm, Nick is relieved that he has stopped dwelling on his feelings about Marge, thinking, “None of it was important now. The wind blew it out of his head.”... (full context)