The Tortilla Curtain

by

T. Coraghessan Boyle

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Cándido and América’s infant daughter, born in a toolshed just outside the wall surrounding the Arroyo Blanco Estates. Socorro’s name means “help” in Spanish. Socorro is born blind, which América believes is the result of José Navidad having raped her. Socorro is lost and presumably drowned in a flood at the very end of the novel.

Socorro Quotes in The Tortilla Curtain

The The Tortilla Curtain quotes below are all either spoken by Socorro or refer to Socorro. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Anger, Hatred, and Bigotry Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Books edition of The Tortilla Curtain published in 1996.
Part 3, Chapter 8 Quotes

América was screaming and the baby was screaming and he could hear his own voice raised in a thin mournful drone, and that was nothing compared to the shrieks of the uprooted trees and the nightmarish roar of the boulders rolling along beneath them.

Related Characters: Cándido Rincón, América Rincón, Socorro
Page Number: 353
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The Tortilla Curtain LitChart as a printable PDF.
The Tortilla Curtain PDF

Socorro Character Timeline in The Tortilla Curtain

The timeline below shows where the character Socorro appears in The Tortilla Curtain. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 3, Chapter 4
Belonging and the American Dream Theme Icon
...that the baby is actually a girl. América announces that she will name the baby Socorro. (full context)
Anger, Hatred, and Bigotry Theme Icon
After several hours of building, Cándido returns to the maintenance shed to fetch América and Socorro. América insists that she wants to “go home to [her] mother” but Cándido manages to... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 6
Fate, Luck, and Egotism Theme Icon
...hard shapeless knot of plastic.” Sitting in the canyon, devastated, Cándido considers leaving América and Socorro, thinking that, since the police will be looking for him, “the agent of all this... (full context)
Belonging and the American Dream Theme Icon
...office (since the labor exchange is long gone). América wishes she had someone to “show [Socorro] off to” but she can’t help but wonder: “Who was going to admire her, Socorro,... (full context)
Belonging and the American Dream Theme Icon
One day América tells Cándido that she would like to have Socorro baptized somewhere, and her birth registered. Cándido doesn’t respond. When América then asks what Cándido... (full context)
Belonging and the American Dream Theme Icon
Violence Against Women Theme Icon
...América feels caught between a desire to “get away, even if it [means] bundling up Socorro and walking all the way back to the border” and a persistent sense of hope... (full context)
The Natural World Theme Icon
Fate, Luck, and Egotism Theme Icon
...he waits outside the post office for hours. One night América cryptically tells Cándido that Socorro needs to see a doctor. Though he feels frustrated by this, Cándido uses it as... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 8
The Natural World Theme Icon
Fate, Luck, and Egotism Theme Icon
...is carrying Cándido and his family away with it. Cándido grabs tight to América and Socorro and holds on. As he is “pitched into he blackness of this new river that... (full context)
Anger, Hatred, and Bigotry Theme Icon
The Natural World Theme Icon
Belonging and the American Dream Theme Icon
...water onto the roof of the post office. América is sobbing and Cándido realizes that Socorro is missing from her arms. He feels “beyond cursing, beyond grieving, numbed right through to... (full context)