The Wars

The Wars

by

Timothy Findley

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A close friend of Mrs. Ross who comes to stay with the family during Mrs. Ross’s gradual deterioration after Robert goes off to war. She maintains a charitable and patriotic public image, handing out candy bars to departing soldiers as a way to support the war effort. Miss Davenport supports Mrs. Ross even as her friend’s behavior becomes increasingly erratic, joining her on walks in the harsh Canadian elements and wheeling Mrs. Ross to the park in Rowena’s wheelchair when she is too intoxicated to walk.

Miss Davenport Quotes in The Wars

The The Wars quotes below are all either spoken by Miss Davenport or refer to Miss Davenport. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Trauma and War Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Australia edition of The Wars published in 1995.
Part 1, Chapter 22 Quotes

“I do not understand. I don’t. I won’t. I can’t. Why is this happening to us, Davenport? What does it mean—to kill your children? Kill them and then…go in there and sing about it! What does that mean?” She wept—but angrily.

Related Characters: Mrs. Ross (speaker), Robert Ross, Miss Davenport
Page Number: 54
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Wars PDF

Miss Davenport Character Timeline in The Wars

The timeline below shows where the character Miss Davenport appears in The Wars. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 22
Trauma and War Theme Icon
Blame, Revenge, and Justice Theme Icon
Loss of Innocence Theme Icon
Honor, Duty, and Heroism Theme Icon
The day after Robert ships off for England, Mrs. Ross’s friend Miss Davenport accompanies the rest of the family to church. Mrs. Ross refuses anyone’s help as she... (full context)
Trauma and War Theme Icon
Blame, Revenge, and Justice Theme Icon
Honor, Duty, and Heroism Theme Icon
...ancient Empires, and Mrs. Ross leaves in outrage when he speaks about Christmas. Accompanied by Miss Davenport , Mrs. Ross goes to outside to sit on the church steps, smoke a cigarette,... (full context)
Trauma and War Theme Icon
Loss of Innocence Theme Icon
...Mrs. Ross composes herself and invites the child back into the church with her and Miss Davenport . The congregation sings a hymn together and Mrs. Ross can only think of how... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 29
Trauma and War Theme Icon
Blame, Revenge, and Justice Theme Icon
...and she begins to wear dark glasses to hide her eyes. As Mrs. Ross deteriorates, Miss Davenport moves into the Ross’s home to support her friend. (full context)
Part 3
Trauma and War Theme Icon
Blame, Revenge, and Justice Theme Icon
...perspective of Robert’s mother. Mrs. Ross begins to seek comfort in rain and snow, forcing Miss Davenport to walk outside with her during storms. She closes her eyes when she passes by... (full context)
Trauma and War Theme Icon
...Buildings in Ottawa are burned down, and Mrs. Ross pores over the news. She tells Miss Davenport that her country is being destroyed by fire. In March, Mrs. Ross braves the harsh... (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 9
Trauma and War Theme Icon
Honor, Duty, and Heroism Theme Icon
...refuses to get dressed and wanders around the house, crying out in a drunken stupor. Miss Davenport , Mr. Ross, Peggy, and Stuart are alarmed by her behavior. Stuart does not wish... (full context)