The Way of the World

The Way of the World

Fainall Character Analysis

The antagonist of the play, Fainall is a sneaky, insecure, and traitorous fellow with a not so good reputation around town—basically, he has all the negative qualities that Mirabell does not. He is the second husband of Lady Wishfort’s daughter, Mrs. Arabella Fainall. A kept man, he hates his rich wife and is having an affair with his wife’s friend, Mrs. Marwood. Together, he and Marwood have developed a plan to cheat Millamant out of her dowry, Arabella out of her property, and Lady Wishfort out of her entire fortune. As the play goes on, it becomes clear that Fainall’s hot-tempered personality is not compatible with effective scheming. Susceptible to intense jealousy, Fainall believes (correctly) that Marwood loves Mirabell and is unable to hide his anger. Once, he even lashes out at his lover, who almost reveals their affair to all their friends. However, he curbs his temper and expends more energy into ruining Mirabell. Fainall hides his dislike of his wife but many people around him suspect that their marriage is a sham and that he is having an affair with Marwood. Mirabell is one such doubter. By the end of the play, when it is clear that Mirabell has triumphed, Fainall unleashes all his rage on his wife, threatening her with physical harm.

Fainall Quotes in The Way of the World

The The Way of the World quotes below are all either spoken by Fainall or refer to Fainall. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Dover Publications edition of The Way of the World published in 1993.
Act 1, Scene 1 Quotes

But for the discovery of this amour, I am indebted to your friend, or your wife’s friend, Mrs. Marwood.

Related Characters: Mirabell (speaker), Fainall, Marwood
Page Number: 3
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est labor

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other The Way of the World quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Act 1, Scene 3 Quotes

And for a discerning man somewhat too passionate a lover, for I like her with all her faults; nay, like her for her faults. Her follies are so natural, or so artful, that they become her, and those affectations which in another woman would be odious serve but to make her more agreeable.

Related Characters: Mirabell (speaker), Fainall, Millamant
Page Number: 5
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 2, Scene 3 Quotes

’Twas for my ease to oversee and wilfully neglect the gross advances made him by my wife, that by permitting her to be engaged, I might continue unsuspected in my pleasures, and take you oftener to my arms in full security. But could you think, because the nodding husband would not wake, that e’er the watchful lover slept?

Related Characters: Fainall (speaker), Mirabell, Marwood, Mrs. Arabella Fainall
Page Number: 17
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

And have you the baseness to charge me with the guilt, unmindful of the merit? To you it should be meritorious that I have been vicious. And do you reflect that guilt upon me which should lie buried in your bosom?

Related Characters: Marwood (speaker), Fainall
Page Number: 18
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 2, Scene 4 Quotes

While I only hated my husband, I could bear to see him; but since I have despised him, he’s too offensive.

Related Characters: Mrs. Arabella Fainall (speaker), Fainall
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

You should have just so much disgust for your husband as may be sufficient to make you relish your lover.

Related Characters: Mirabell (speaker), Fainall, Mrs. Arabella Fainall
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 3, Scene 18 Quotes

I, it seems, am a husband, a rank husband, and my wife a very errant, rank wife,—all in the way of the world.

Related Characters: Fainall (speaker), Marwood
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

You married her to keep you; and if you can contrive to have her keep you better than you expected, why should you not keep her longer than you intended?

Related Characters: Marwood (speaker), Fainall, Mrs. Arabella Fainall
Page Number: 43
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur

Let husbands be jealous, but let the lover still believe: or if he doubt, let it be only to endear his pleasure, and prepare the joy that follows, when he proves his mistress true. But let husbands’ doubts convert to endless jealousy; or if they have belief, let it corrupt to superstition and blind credulity.

Related Characters: Fainall (speaker), Marwood
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 5, Scene 6 Quotes

… I will be endowed, in right of my wife, with that six thousand pound, which is the moiety of Mrs. Millamant’s fortune in your possession, and which she has forfeited (…by the last will and testament of your deceased husband…) by her disobedience in contracting herself against your consent or knowledge, and by refusing the offered match with Sir Wilfull Witwoud

Related Characters: Fainall (speaker), Lady Wishfort
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Get the entire The Way of the World LitChart as a printable PDF.
The way of the world.pdf.medium

Fainall Character Timeline in The Way of the World

The timeline below shows where the character Fainall appears in The Way of the World. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 1
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
...a London chocolate house, a fashionable meeting place for eighteenth-century gentlemen. Two men, Mirabell and Fainall, are playing cards. Fainall ends the game, though, when he senses that Mirabell’s mind is... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Fainall encourages Mirabell to confide in him about his uncommonly glum demeanor. Mirabell reveals that he’s... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Fainall also reminds Mirabell that he has only himself to blame for Wishfort’s low opinion of... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...her by Mrs. Marwood, a close family friend to both Wishfort and her daughter, Mrs. Fainall (Fainall’s wife). Mirabell also hints that Marwood is more than just a friend to Fainall. (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Fainall ignores Mirabell’s insinuation that he’s having an affair with Marwood. Instead, Fainall asks Mirabell for... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...he never paid much attention to her. This answer, however, does not satisfy the jealous Fainall, who can’t tell whether something more took place between Mirabell and Marwood. The conversation by... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 3
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Shortly after the messenger leaves, Fainall rejoins Mirabell and notes his improved mood. Mirabell responds only that he is engaged in... (full context)
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Rather than arguing further with Fainall, Mirabell describes his love of Millamant. He explains that he loves the entirety of Millamant,... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 4
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
While Mirabell and Fainall are in conversation, a messenger approaches Betty, the chocolate house waitress, who has been waiting... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 5
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Having witnessed the exchange between Betty and the messenger, Mirabell and Fainall begin gossiping about Sir Wilfull. In particular, they criticize his plan to better himself by... (full context)
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Fainall describes Sir Wilfull as an altogether lovable and harmless fool, with a penchant for drunkenness.... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 6
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...want to dwell on the topic of his half-brother, and instead turns the conversation to Fainall, and compliments Fainall for having a happy marriage. Mirabell responds that Mrs. Fainall would draw... (full context)
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
...who has recently won quite a bit of Witwoud’s money in a game of cards. Fainall teases Witwoud that it’s only fair that Petulant should have won Witwoud’s money because Witwoud... (full context)
...to name the particular flaw of Petulant’s that most annoys him. This leads Mirabell and Fainall to suggest numerous defects in Petulant’s personality: illiteracy, small vocabulary, etc. But Witwoud claims to... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 8
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Witwoud observes the exchange between Betty and the coachman and comments to Mirabell and Fainall that Petulant actually hired the women outside to pretend to be his lovers and thereby... (full context)
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Witwoud explains Petulant’s trick of “calling on himself” to a baffled Mirabell and Fainall. Petulant used to slip out of the chocolate house, rush home, disguise his appearance, and... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 9
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
...to send the coach away, even if the women inside snivel and cry. Mirabell and Fainall of course, begin to tease him about his ill treatment of the three unknown women.... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
...in public, that he, Petulant, has common sense. Mirabell promises to do what he can. Fainall, remarks that Mirabell seems worried about Petulant and Witwoud as competitors for Millamant’s affections. (full context)
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
After Witwoud’s report, Mirabell invites Fainall to leave the chocolate house with him and go for a walk in the Mall.... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Two friends Mrs. Fainall and Mrs. Marwood walk in St. James’s Park, discussing men and love. Mrs. Fainall remarks... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall is surprised by Marwood’s philosophy, as it stands in contrast to the anti-men ideology of... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Marwood switches her stance. She tells Mrs. Fainall that she, too, despises men and only lied about liking them to see if she... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall replies that it’s too bad, then, that Marwood isn’t married to Mirabell. Marwood blushes, and... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Marwood insists that she hates Mirabell, because he’s so proud, but Mrs. Fainall insists Marwood is lying. Marwood responds that Mrs. Fainall also acts more like a friend... (full context)
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall changes the subject, saying she feels sick because she has just spotted her husband walking... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Mirabell and Fainall, also walking in the park, have just seen Mrs. Fainall and Marwood and head towards... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...married couple greets each other with pet names, like “my dear” and “my soul.” Then, Fainall tells his wife that she looks ill. Mirabell gallantly says that Fainall is the only... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall ignores her husband’s remark and addresses Mirabell, telling him that she wants to hear more... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall then adds that she doesn’t want to walk with her husband, joking that by not... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 3
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Once alone with Marwood, Fainall comments that if he lived long enough to be “rid” of his wife, he would... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Marwood asks Fainall if he wants to follow Mrs. Fainall and Mirabell. Fainall does not. Yet Marwood encourages... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Marwood responds that in fact she is trying to protect Fainall’s “honor.” Fainall realizes her insinuation, that she believes Mirabell and Mrs. Fainall are more than... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Marwood angrily denies Fainall’s accusations. But Fainall persists: he says that he recognized and ignored Mirabell’s “gross advances” toward... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Marwood asks him to tell her what, exactly, he is accusing her of. Fainall responds that she is guilty of “infidelity, with loving another, with love of Mirabell.” Marwood... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...Mirabell toy with, led her to reveal to Wishfort his true intentions in flattering her. Fainall doesn’t buy Marwood’s explanation, mocking the idea of her “professed” friendship to Wishfort and denouncing... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...“vain” and “empty vows” of men to their lovers and to one another. To this, Fainall reminds Marwood that she claims to be his wife’s friend, too. Marwood responds angrily that... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Fainall, chastened, says that Marwood misinterpreted him. He meant only to remind her of how she... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...affair to his wife and that she’d rather be exposed as an adulteress than allow Fainall’s continued bad behavior. She says the world needs to know about the “injuries” he has... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Fainall adds that if Marwood hadn’t been untrue, he would have repaid her expenses. He explains... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Fainall replies that they must not part like this, and grabs her hands. Marwood tells him... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Shocked to hear Marwood speak to him like this, Fainall promises her that he would never hurt her, but still does not let go of... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Fainall says she’s being dramatic, but asks her forgiveness, and tells her not to cry. He... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
...with her. Then, he guides her down a different path to avoid Mirabell and Mrs. Fainall. (full context)
Act 2, Scene 4
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall and Mirabell watch Marwood and Fainall take another path in the park. Mrs. Fainall remarks... (full context)
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall agrees, admitting she loved with “indiscretion.” Mirabell suggests a formula of sorts for hating her... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Mirabell adds that he selected Fainall as a husband for her because he fit a certain type. Mirabell wanted someone who... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall is not satisfied with this explanation and reproaches Mirabell, telling him that she “ought to... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall is intrigued and asks him whom he has chosen to play the role of his... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall checks whether he would release her mother from the marriage by producing Waitwell’s marriage certificate... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...his marriage to Millamant and release Millamant’s fortune before he would produce the certificate. Mrs. Fainall, evidently in approval of the plan, informs Mirabell that her mother spoke just last night... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall thinks Mirabell’s plan looks promising because her mother “will do anything to get a husband.”... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 18
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
While everyone else is at dinner, Marwood and Fainall meet alone in Wishfort’s house. She has just finished telling Fainall everything she has learned,... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Fainall curses and then complains that the fortune would easily have been his if Marwood had... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...money can come to him by other means. She reveals another plan that would get Fainall the money. If he reveals Mrs. Fainall’s former affair with Mirabell to Wishfort and threatens... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Fainall likes this plan. Marwood then apologizes for suggesting to Wishfort that Millamant should marry Wilfull,... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Next, Fainall affirms that he doesn’t love his wife and that he and Marwood will be victorious.... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Fainall agrees to this plan and says that if worst comes to worst, he can always... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
...him if he believes that she hates Mirabell now and if he’ll be jealous again. Fainall denies being jealous and seals his promise to not become so again with a kiss. (full context)
Act 4, Scene 9
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall, then, asks Witwoud how the three men came to be so drunk and start arguing... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall enters the dressing room. Seeing Foible distressed, she tries to comfort her and find out... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall realizes that, if her mother knows everything, then she also knows of her own affair... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 3
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...news: Waitwell has been released from prison, while Wishfort is terribly upset over something that Fainall has told her. He is shouting at a crying Wishfort that he’ll have her fortune... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall orders Foible to tell Mincing that she must reveal what she knows about Marwood’s affair... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 4
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
...imposter, Sir Rowland. She also thanks her for taking the lead role in negotiating with Fainall about his demands. She then tells Marwood that at the end of all this nasty... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mrs. Fainall enters. Wishfort condemns her daughter and tells her that because of her affair, she must... (full context)
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Wishfort apologizes to Marwood and scolds her daughter for her ungratefulness. Mrs. Fainall, however, sticks to her story and defiantly offers to stand trial to prove her innocence.... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 5
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...her daughter’s innocence or guilt. She concludes that her daughter should be considered innocent until Fainall proves otherwise. (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...case goes to trial. Wishfort agrees that Marwood is right: it is better to pay Fainall for keeping silent than to demand justice. (full context)
Act 5, Scene 6
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Fainall has joined the women in the parlor to make his demands known to Wishfort. Marwood... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...loophole. She says that Wilfull was indisposed and did not properly propose to her niece. Fainall, however, tells her that he isn’t there to debate but only make demands. She asks... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 7
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Once Fainall leaves, Wishfort again complains to Marwood. She asks whether she should agree to Fainall’s terms.... (full context)
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Wishfort complains that marrying Fainall was her daughter’s idea. She bemoans the loss of good and noble Languish, her daughter’s... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 8
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...and asks her if she’s indeed willing to marry her cousin to save her from Fainall’s treachery. (full context)
Act 5, Scene 10
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Marwood returns to the living room, with Fainall following. Fainall addresses Wishfort and tells her that the time for her to deliberate has... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...marry Wilfull, a move that legally prevents her from turning all her fortune over to Fainall. At first, Fainall doesn’t believe this could be true. But Millamant assures him that she... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Wilfull, too, speaks out against Fainall, threatening to use his “instrument,” meaning his sword, to slice through Fainall’s contract if he... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Wishfort wails for a way to prevent Fainall from ruining her. Mirabell begins to answer that he knows of a remedy but dismisses... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...She tells Mirabell that she will forgive him for everything he’s done if he prevents Fainall’s plan from succeeding. Mirabell agrees to help her even as he laments the loss of... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 11
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Seeing the two servants enter together with Mrs. Fainall, Marwood instantly realizes that they are going to expose her affair with Fainall to Wishfort.... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Meanwhile, under questioning, Foible and Mincing both swear that Marwood was having an affair with Fainall. Wishfort, angrily, turns to Marwood and asks her whether she has deceived her. Marwood asks... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mincing is upset to be called a “mercenary” and tells Marwood that she actually saw Fainall and Marwood together. Furthermore, Mincing continues, she could have been justly called mercenary if Marwood... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Fainall tells Mincing to get lost and reminds her that she has not profited by telling... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 12
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Wits and Fools Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...who are slow to arrive because they have just woken up from their drunken naps. Fainall expresses his annoyance at Mirabell’s slow and suspenseful manner of revealing his plan. (full context)
Act 5, Scene 13
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
Mirabell addresses Fainall and informs him that before his wife married him, she signed away her fortune to... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
At first Fainall thinks that Mirabell is bluffing. But then he begins to read the document, and realizes... (full context)
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Enraged, Fainall charges at Mrs. Fainall and screams that he will get revenge. However, Wilfull steps in... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 14
Jealousy, Deceit, and Intrigue Theme Icon
Men vs. Women Theme Icon
Female (In)dependence Theme Icon
Love and Money Theme Icon
...song. Wishfort excuses herself from the festivities, claiming that she is fatigued and worried that Fainall will do something desperate. Mirabell reassures her that Fainall cannot hurt the family. Before Wishfort... (full context)