The Woman in Black

by

Susan Hill

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Mr. Jerome Character Analysis

Mr. Jerome is a real estate agent in Crythin Gifford who is appointed as Arthur’s guide in town, and who accompanies him to Mrs. Drablow’s funeral. A quiet and nervous man, Jerome deteriorates into full-blown panic when Arthur mentions having seen the woman in black at the funeral service. Arthur attempts to engage Mr. Jerome’s help in sorting through the many papers in Eel Marsh House, but Mr. Jerome is so petrified that he refuses to help and warns Arthur that no one else in town will come to his aid, either. It is eventually revealed that Mr. Jerome had a child who died as a result of the woman in black’s fearsome curse.
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Mr. Jerome Character Timeline in The Woman in Black

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Jerome appears in The Woman in Black. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4: The Funeral of Mrs. Drablow
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Arthur returns to the inn to find a note from Mr. Jerome—the man Mr. Bentley arranged to be Arthur’s companion at the funeral and guide in Crythin... (full context)
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...if Mrs. Drablow is to be buried in the churchyard or a family plot. Mr. Jerome is silent for a moment, and then admits that though there is a family grave,... (full context)
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Arthur, Jerome, and the rest of the gathered mourners join the woman in black at the graveside,... (full context)
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As Mr. Jerome and Arthur depart the churchyard, Arthur remarks that he hopes the “dreadfully unwell” woman in... (full context)
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...fleetingly what connection the two women have, and then points the woman out to Mr. Jerome with his finger. Jerome grabs Arthur’s wrist in a tight grip. Arthur wonders if Jerome... (full context)
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The Past Theme Icon
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By the time the men get back to town, Arthur notices that Mr. Jerome is looking much better. Arthur asks if Jerome is going to accompany him over to... (full context)
Chapter 7: Mr. Jerome is Afraid
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The Past Theme Icon
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...is cheered by the idea of bicycling. First, however, he wants to speak with Mr. Jerome about sending an office boy to Eel Marsh with Arthur so that he does not... (full context)
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Arthur arrives at Mr. Jerome’s office and knocks at the door. Mr. Jerome answers; it is clear from the look... (full context)
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The Past Theme Icon
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Arthur tells Mr. Jerome that he understands what Jerome is getting at—there is not a soul in town or... (full context)
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Arthur takes his leave, and Mr. Jerome expresses the hope that Arthur will not encounter the woman in black again. Arthur, putting... (full context)
Chapter 9: In the Nursery
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...“Drablow” on a couple of newer stones, and understands that this is the family plot Jerome spoke of. (full context)
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...his bicycle and goes back into town for more food. He speaks pleasantly with Mr. Jerome on the street and does not mention Eel Marsh House. At the inn, he receives... (full context)
Chapter 11: A Packet of Letters
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...to live with “whatever will surely follow.” For fifty years, many denizens of the town—including Jerome and Keckwick—have suffered the curse of Eel Marsh House. (full context)
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The Past Theme Icon
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...died in some “violent or dreadful circumstance,” often in an accident or an illness. Mr. Jerome’s own child, Daily reveals, was a victim of the woman in black. Arthur wonders whether... (full context)