Thinking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow

by

Daniel Kahneman

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Paul Slovic Character Analysis

A psychologist who proposed the affect heuristic, in which people let their likes and dislikes determine their beliefs about the world. Slovic also explored topics of risk, asserting that expert opinions should not be the only ones considered in evaluations of risk. He believes that the average citizen’s concerns should be taken into account when creating public policy—in contrast with the ideas of Cass Sunstein.

Paul Slovic Quotes in Thinking, Fast and Slow

The Thinking, Fast and Slow quotes below are all either spoken by Paul Slovic or refer to Paul Slovic. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition of Thinking, Fast and Slow published in 2011.
Part 2, Chapter 13 Quotes

The lesson is clear: estimates of causes of death are warped by media coverage. The coverage is itself biased toward novelty and poignancy.

Related Characters: Daniel Kahneman (speaker), Paul Slovic
Page Number: 138
Explanation and Analysis:
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Paul Slovic Character Timeline in Thinking, Fast and Slow

The timeline below shows where the character Paul Slovic appears in Thinking, Fast and Slow. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 9
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
...use their preexisting beliefs to come to conclusions, rather than considering new arguments. Psychologist Paul Slovic has proposed an “affect heuristic,” in which people let their likes and dislikes determine their... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 13
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
An influential study designed by Paul Slovic asked participants in a survey to consider pairs of causes of death (e.g., diabetes and... (full context)
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
Paul Slovic eventually developed the notion of the affect heuristic, in which people substitute the question “What... (full context)
Stories and Subjectivity vs. Statistics and Objectivity Theme Icon
Slovic does a lot of work with risk and paints a picture of the average person... (full context)
Stories and Subjectivity vs. Statistics and Objectivity Theme Icon
Another scholar, Cass Sunstein, argues against Slovic. Sunstein believes that the system of regulation in the United States reflects public pressure and... (full context)