Thinking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow

by

Daniel Kahneman

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Thinking, Fast and Slow can help.

What You See Is All There Is (WYSIATI) Term Analysis

A phrase that Kahneman uses, often in acronym form, to discuss the principle that people are often biased by information that is presented to them, because they assume that this information is all that is needed to make a decision. It is a flaw in our thinking, because it fails to allow for the possibility that necessary evidence might be missing when we are making a judgment.

What You See Is All There Is (WYSIATI) Quotes in Thinking, Fast and Slow

The Thinking, Fast and Slow quotes below are all either spoken by What You See Is All There Is (WYSIATI) or refer to What You See Is All There Is (WYSIATI). For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition of Thinking, Fast and Slow published in 2011.
Part 1, Chapter 7 Quotes

We often fail to allow for the possibility that evidence that should be critical to our judgment is missing—what we see is all there is.

Related Characters: Daniel Kahneman (speaker)
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2, Chapter 13 Quotes

The lesson is clear: estimates of causes of death are warped by media coverage. The coverage is itself biased toward novelty and poignancy.

Related Characters: Daniel Kahneman (speaker), Paul Slovic
Page Number: 138
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4, Chapter 30 Quotes

You read that “a vaccine that protects children from a fatal disease carries a 0.001% risk of permanent disability.” The risk appears small. Now consider another description of the same risk: “One of 100,000 vaccinated children will be permanently disabled.” The second statement does something to your mind that the first does not.

Related Characters: Daniel Kahneman (speaker)
Page Number: 329
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Thinking, Fast and Slow LitChart as a printable PDF.
Thinking, Fast and Slow PDF

What You See Is All There Is (WYSIATI) Term Timeline in Thinking, Fast and Slow

The timeline below shows where the term What You See Is All There Is (WYSIATI) appears in Thinking, Fast and Slow. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 7
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
Kahneman next introduces a principle, which he terms “What You See Is All There Is” (WYSIATI). If we are asked whether a person will be a good leader and are told... (full context)
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
Stories and Subjectivity vs. Statistics and Objectivity Theme Icon
WYSIATI implies that neither the quality nor the quantity of the evidence counts for much. The... (full context)
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
Choices, Losses, and Gains Theme Icon
WYSIATI also accounts for framing effects. The statement that “the odds of survival one month after... (full context)
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
Stories and Subjectivity vs. Statistics and Objectivity Theme Icon
Lastly, WYSIATI accounts for what Kahneman calls “base-rate neglect.” Kahneman briefly describes a fictional man named Steve... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
Human Fallibility and Overconfidence Theme Icon
...one for which they had already calculated their answer. This is also an example of WYSIATI. The present state of mind looms very large when people evaluate happiness. (full context)
Intuition, Deliberation, and Laziness Theme Icon
...creating patterns of ideas, inferring causes, exaggerating consistency (the halo effect), focusing on existing evidence (WYSIATI), matching intensities across scales (e.g., size to loudness), computing more than intended, substituting easy questions... (full context)