'Tis Pity She's a Whore

by

John Ford

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'Tis Pity She's a Whore: Act 2, Scene 6 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Meanwhile, Florio asks Annabella what Giovanni is doing, and Annabella tells him that he has gone to the Friar. Florio comments on how holy the Friar is, and how he hopes that he’ll teach Giovanni how to get to Heaven.
Florio’s statement is slightly ironic in light of the previous scene, in which the Friar told Giovanni that he is falling further and further from Heaven.
Themes
Religious Piety vs. False Idols Theme Icon
Donado enters and presents the letter he wrote for Annabella on Bergetto’s behalf as well as a jewel for her (a ring). He describes how much Bergetto is in love with Annabella. Puttana tells Donado that she has been commending Bergetto to Annabella every night. Donado gives Puttana money in return.
Donado continues with his attempts to make Bergetto a “golden calf.” Even though Annabella does not fall victim to this display of wealth, Puttana certainly takes advantage of it herself.
Themes
Religious Piety vs. False Idols Theme Icon
Annabella reads the letter at Florio and Donado’s insistence. She returns the jewel she was given, saying that she counts Bergetto’s love as a jewel. Donado insists that she keep it. At that moment Florio notices that Annabella is not wearing the ring her mother gave her, which she is meant to give to her husband. Annabella says that Giovanni took it from her that morning.
Annabella is unmoved by the tokens she is given and evidently does not fall victim to the idolization of wealth. However, the audience is reminded of a different kind of idolization when she confesses that her own ring, a symbol of her desire, was given quite recklessly to Giovanni despite the fact that they cannot marry.
Themes
Religious Piety vs. False Idols Theme Icon
Florio ignores Annabella’s explanation of her ring’s disappearance and returns to asking what she thinks of Bergetto. She says that she will not raise his fortunes much and that he should find someone worthier. Donado is appreciative of her frankness and confirms that he and Florio will still be friends.
Annabella plays on Donado’s evident desire for and idolization of wealth by making wordplay using the words “fortunes” and “worthier.” This again demonstrates her relative indifference to money compared to love.
Themes
Religious Piety vs. False Idols Theme Icon
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Bergetto and Poggio enter. Bergetto has bandages on his head. He asks if Annabella liked his letter and proceeds to tell her a funny story. He describes how he was walking and someone pushed him into a wall. Bergetto called the man a rogue, and the man hit him. A doctor (Richardetto) came over to bandage him up, accompanied by a young woman (Philotis) with whom Bergetto immediately fell in love. Bergetto describes how she washed him and kissed him, and he says that she is worth twenty of Annabella.
Even though Bergetto’s marriage plot has failed, his stupidity continues. Bergetto, like many of the other characters, quickly falls victim to the passions of love when he sees Philotis. This passion will eventually spell his downfall at the hands of Grimaldi.
Themes
Passion, Lust, and Bloodlust Theme Icon
Donado, who continues to be amazed at Bergetto’s stupidity, thanks Florio for allowing his nephew to try to woo Annabella. Donado tells her to keep the jewel in anticipation of her marriage. Donado, Bergetto, and Poggio exit. Giovanni enters, and Florio asks where he has been, describing how Annabella got rid of her foolish suitor. Florio says Soranzo is the only man he likes, and then exits for dinner.
Florio once again reveals his preference for Soranzo, a choice that sets Florio up as a practical father. In comparison with the hot-headed Grimaldi and the wealth-obsessed team of Bergetto and Donado, Soranzo seems like the most reasonable choice, and the play continues to reward characters for reason over passion.
Themes
Passion, Lust, and Bloodlust Theme Icon
Desire vs. Duty Theme Icon
Giovanni asks Annabella whose ring she has. She jokes that “a lusty youth” (Donado) gave it to her. Giovanni tells her she must not wear it and that she must send it back. She asks if he is jealous, and he responds that she will know how jealous he is when night is upon them.
Giovanni then reveals his jealousy—emotions which spur characters to further and further violence throughout the rest of the play. Annabella’s comment about a “lusty youth” is made in jest, but it points at Giovanni’s own weakness.
Themes
Passion, Lust, and Bloodlust Theme Icon