'Tis Pity She's a Whore

by

John Ford

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'Tis Pity She's a Whore: Act 3, Scene 1 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Bergetto and Poggio discuss Bergetto’s newfound love, saying that his uncle Donado no longer has any right to think of him as a child. They recount how Philotis has in a way promised to marry him, and he has already gotten consent from her uncle, the doctor (Richardetto).
Bergetto’s transition from focusing on diversions to obsessing over Philotis is quick and provides another example of passion having an all-consuming power that makes people single-minded in their thoughts and actions.
Themes
Passion, Lust, and Bloodlust Theme Icon
Bergetto tells Poggio that Philotis gave him a codpiece-fastener and a box of marmalade, and then she kissed him. Poggio persuades Bergetto that he should marry Philotis in secret. Bergetto describes how his courage is beginning to rise, and that he is unafraid of Donado’s reaction.
Bergetto’s descriptions of his interactions with Philotis contain many direct and indirect innuendos, and Bergetto adds to them with the euphemism of “rising courage” to make his lust more explicit.
Themes
Passion, Lust, and Bloodlust Theme Icon