Tracks

Lulu Nanapush is Fleur’s daughter. It is unclear who Lulu’s father is, but Eli serves as her father throughout the story, with Nanapush as a grandfather and Margaret as a grandmother. Nanapush’s sections of the story are being told to Lulu as an adult in an attempt to explain to her why her mother has sent her away, and also to discourage her from marrying into the Morrissey family. Lulu is a child for the entirety of her role in the book, cheerful though foolish, as when she decides to wear her thin leather shoes in the snow, causing frostbite. Fleur sends Lulu to boarding school after her land is lost, but Lulu resents this decision, ultimately returning to Nanapush and Margaret.

Lulu Nanapush Quotes in Tracks

The Tracks quotes below are all either spoken by Lulu Nanapush or refer to Lulu Nanapush. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper Perennial edition of Tracks published in 2011.
Chapter 2 Quotes

That spring, I went to help out in her cabin when she bore the child, whose green eyes and skin the color of an old penny have made more talk, as no one can decide if the child is mixed blood or what, fathered in a smokehouse, or by a man with brass scales, or by the lake. The girl is bold, smiling in her sleep, as if she knows what people wonder, as if she hears the old men talk, turning the story over. It comes up different every time, and has no ending, no beginning. They get the middle wrong too. They only know they don’t know anything.

Related Characters: Pauline Puyat (speaker), Fleur Pillager, Lulu Nanapush
Page Number: 31
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Chapter 6 Quotes

Then Fleur washed me, but I warned myself not to experience any pleasure. I sat down in the water, felts its heat as a sharp danger, but then I forgot. The child soaped my back with a slick plant, and scrubbed the agonizing itch of rough twine and harsh woolens. I gave her my hand. She washed each finger, then each toe. Fleur pared the overgrown nails with a knife. The girl rinsed away the sting of nettles, aggravation of hooked burrs. She dislodged the invisible strands of screwgrass that had woven into my skin. Fleur poured a pitcher of warm water over me and then began to shampoo my head and hair. It was so terrible, so pleasant, that I abandoned my Lord and all His rules and special requirements.

Related Characters: Pauline Puyat (speaker), Fleur Pillager, Lulu Nanapush
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 9 Quotes

She sent you to the government school, it is true, but you must understand there were reasons: there would be no place for you, no safety on this reservation, no hiding from government papers, or from Morrisseys who shaved heads or the Turcot Company, leveler of the whole forest. There was also no predicting what would happen to Fleur herself. So you were sent away, another piece cut from my heart.

Related Characters: Nanapush (speaker), Fleur Pillager, Lulu Nanapush
Page Number: 219
Explanation and Analysis:
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Lulu Nanapush Character Timeline in Tracks

The timeline below shows where the character Lulu Nanapush appears in Tracks. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Winter 1912, Manitou-geezisohns, Little Spirit Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
Nanapush tells his granddaughter (Lulu) of the slow decline of his Anishinabe tribe due to consumption. By the end of... (full context)
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...“windigo.” Inside the cabin, Nanapush finds the dead bodies of an old man and woman (Lulu’s grandparents), a little boy, and two little girls, all facing west. In the corner he... (full context)
Chapter 2: Summer 1913, Miskomini-geezis, Raspberry Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
...in the smokehouse, or by the Agent, or by the lake monster Misshepeshu. The child (Lulu) smiles in her sleep, perhaps because she knows people argue over her story—but the story... (full context)
Chapter 3: Fall 1913-Spring 2014, Onaubin-geezis, Crust on the Snow Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
Nanapush continue his story to Lulu, telling her that his name loses power each time the government uses it, and so... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Nanapush explains to Lulu that Pauline was always unclassifiable as a person and uncomfortable to be around, so they... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...pleased his wives, but he does not mention his dead daughter, who was also named Lulu. Nanapush talks for a long time, telling all his stories, all connected so that there... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...kinship, but only to see proof that the child is not Eli’s. Nanapush later tells Lulu that the appearance of the child provided no proof of her parentage, though. He informs... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
...it can be named. Left outside with the priest, Nanapush says to name the child Lulu Nanapush. (full context)
Chapter 4: Winter 1914-Summer 1917, Meen-geezis, Blueberry Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...that Misshepeshu is benevolent for a time. She sees the light of his eyes in Lulu, but also sees the Kashpaw nose on her face (suggesting that Eli might be her... (full context)
Chapter 5: Fall 1917-Spring 1918, Manitou-geezis, Strong Spirit Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...and Sophie, expanding to include the differing opinions about money and settlements. Nanapush, Margaret, and Lulu go to church, where Father Damien is happy to finally see Nanapush. At church Nanapush... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Boy and Clarence then jump out to grapple with Margaret and Nanapush, and Lulu runs off. Margaret bites Boy Lazarre, giving him a wound that will later kill him.... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
When they are finally freed, Margaret calls out for Lulu, but they find her safe, sitting with Nector at Margaret’s house. The kids ask where... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
When the snow thaws, it’s Margaret who wakes Nanapush with a spoonful of berries. Lulu is there too, with a new pair of patent leather shoes tied to her belt... (full context)
Chapter 6: Spring 1918-Winter 1919, Payaetonookaedaed-geeziz, Wood Louse Sun
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Fleur offers to wash Pauline’s clothes so that she can come inside. Fleur tells Lulu to gather snow to melt into water from outside. Margaret leaves, accompanying Eli and Nector... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...She grabs something that she is unsure is the alder, and begins to boil it. Lulu puts on her thin patent leather shoes and goes to Margaret’s house to retrieve the... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...from Fleur, signifying the death of the baby. Lily then pulls out a lock of Lulu’s hair and a patent leather shoe, and Fleur plays now for Lulu’s life. She wins... (full context)
Chapter 7: Winter 1918-Spring 1919, Paguk Beboon, Skeleton Winter
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
Nanapush finds Lulu passed out outside Margaret’s cabin. Lulu is so frozen that she can say only that... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
Father Damien arrives with the off-reservation doctor, and with butter to spread on Lulu’s frostbitten skin. The doctor examines Lulu and gives her Laudanum, and says he must take... (full context)
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
Nanapush nurses Lulu for days in Margaret’s cabin, though Fleur, trapped in her own cabin by the weather... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
When Nanapush arrives at the cabin, Fleur looks ragged and sick, and lurches toward Lulu on the sled. The black umbrella has been propped in the tree where the baby’s... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
Nanapush tells Lulu that Napoleon was driven to drink again by the new relatives in the house. He... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
Nanapush says that after Fleur lost her other baby, she became more protective of Lulu. Margaret asks Fleur to let Lulu have some freedom now. Nanapush identifies with Fleur’s reaction... (full context)
Chapter 9: Fall 1919-1924, Minomini-geezis, Wild Rice Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...Nanapush loses himself in his thoughts as he approaches the untouched wilderness surrounding Fleur’s cabin. Lulu approaches him, looking for candies, but finds none. She leads him to Fleur. (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...then says that, after this, the three never lived together again. It is revealed that Lulu won’t visit Fleur now, because she’s angry her mother sent her away. When Nanapush finishes... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...She remains silent, purposefully sorting stones, putting them into the pockets of her skirt, and Lulu helps her. Eli promises to earn money to buy some of her land back, but... (full context)
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
...her, but Fleur struggles against him. Eli drags her back to land, unconscious. Nanapush tells Lulu to go fetch blankets, and announces that this is the third time Fleur has drowned.... (full context)
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
...lumber bankers, officials, and Morrisseys. Nanapush and Fleur are quiet for a long time, until Lulu says something silly in her sleep, and the two of them laugh together. Margaret arrives,... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
Nanapush tells Lulu that Fleur sent her away because she could not protect Lulu from all these threats,... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
After this, Margaret and Nanapush attempt to get Lulu back from the government school. Nector goes to Oklahoma. In their attempts to battle the... (full context)