Tracks

Misshepeshu Character Analysis

The lake monster said to guard Matchimanito. He is feared by the villagers and assumed to be evil because of the way the lake has proven inhospitable to anyone but the Pillager family. Fleur seems to have a more amicable relationship with the spirit, though, and some people believe she has a romantic relationship with the monster that keeps it at bay. Villagers even speculate as to whether Misshepeshu might be the father of Fleur’s children. When Pauline loses her mind near the end of the book, she conflates Misshepeshu with the devil, and believes she is attacking the monster, when in fact it is Napoleon she kills.
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Misshepeshu Character Timeline in Tracks

The timeline below shows where the character Misshepeshu appears in Tracks. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Winter 1912, Manitou-geezisohns, Little Spirit Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...woods in the hopes of measuring the lake, despite their fear of the lake monster, Misshepeshu. Nanapush tries to convince Fleur to stay with him in his cabin, but she remains... (full context)
Chapter 2: Summer 1913, Miskomini-geezis, Raspberry Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...his own bathtub. After this, despite Fleur’s beauty, men steer clear of her, certain that Misshepeshu, the lake monster, wants her for himself. Pauline shares the warnings that mothers give to... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
...parentage of: fathered in the smokehouse, or by the Agent, or by the lake monster Misshepeshu. The child (Lulu) smiles in her sleep, perhaps because she knows people argue over her... (full context)
Chapter 4: Winter 1914-Summer 1917, Meen-geezis, Blueberry Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...selfish way for her to find peace. Speaking of the reservation again, Pauline says that Misshepeshu is benevolent for a time. She sees the light of his eyes in Lulu, but... (full context)
Chapter 5: Fall 1917-Spring 1918, Manitou-geezis, Strong Spirit Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...that Fleur’s rejection of his advances is caused by her copulating with the lake monster Misshepeshu. Eli thinks Fleur is pregnant, but not by him. (full context)
Chapter 8: Spring 1919, Baubaukunaetae-geezis, Patches of Earth Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...Pauline, meanwhile, believes that Christ hid from her out of cowardice in the face of Misshepeshu, but she commits herself again to God despite his weakness. When her bandages are changed,... (full context)