Tracks

Moses Pillager Character Analysis

Fleur’s cousin, who goes “half-windigo” as a way of protecting himself from the consumption epidemic. He lives on an island in Matchimanito Lake and makes potions that tribes people trade him for, including the love medicine that cause Eli and Sophie to have a brief affair, and the medicine that allows Fleur to become less protective of Lulu.

Moses Pillager Quotes in Tracks

The Tracks quotes below are all either spoken by Moses Pillager or refer to Moses Pillager. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Harper Perennial edition of Tracks published in 2011.
Chapter 7 Quotes

I mixed and crushed the ingredients. The paste must be rubbed on the hands a certain way, then up to the elbows, with exact words said. When I first dreamed the method of doing this, I got rude laughter. I got jokes about little boys playing with fire. But the person who visited my dream told me what plants to spread so that I could plunge my arms into a boiling stew kettle, pull meat from the bottom, or reach into the body itself and remove, as I did so long ago with Moses, the name that burned, the sickness.

Related Characters: Nanapush (speaker), Moses Pillager
Page Number: 188
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Tracks quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Get the entire Tracks LitChart as a printable PDF.
Tracks.pdf.medium

Moses Pillager Character Timeline in Tracks

The timeline below shows where the character Moses Pillager appears in Tracks. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Winter 1912, Manitou-geezisohns, Little Spirit Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
...a young new priest, appears at their door one day to say that Fleur’s cousin Moses has been found in the woods. When Nanapush goes outside to gather snow to boil... (full context)
Chapter 3: Fall 1913-Spring 2014, Onaubin-geezis, Crust on the Snow Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...of better quality. The people are even more afraid of meeting Fleur or her cousin Moses, who it is said has turned half animal as a way of defeating consumption. When... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
It’s Moses who visits town to buy supplies for both himself and Fleur, and to pay off... (full context)
Chapter 4: Winter 1914-Summer 1917, Meen-geezis, Blueberry Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...up at the Morrisseys’ to work. Pauline has acquired a sack of medicine powder from Moses, who forces Pauline to tell him her plan—which is to snare Eli—even though she knows... (full context)
Chapter 6: Spring 1918-Winter 1919, Payaetonookaedaed-geeziz, Wood Louse Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
...promises not to try to stop the pregnancy again. Pauline struggles with this, knowing that Moses Pillager could make a potion to cause her to lose the child. Bernadette watches Pauline... (full context)
Chapter 7: Winter 1918-Spring 1919, Paguk Beboon, Skeleton Winter
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...understand because she has not experienced this tragedy. Still, Nanapush thinks he should go to Moses to get a medicine to allow Fleur to detach from Lulu. Nanapush brings gifts to... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
Two days later, Moses approaches the Pillager cabin carrying two drums. Nanapush mixes yarrow with another ingredient he won’t... (full context)
Chapter 9: Fall 1919-1924, Minomini-geezis, Wild Rice Sun
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
Moses says that the spirit of the lost Pillager baby had been watching over the land,... (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...wonders if she is still in her right mind, trailed now by cats the way Moses is on his island. (full context)
Tradition, Assimilation, and Religion Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Self-Destruction vs. Outside Influences Theme Icon
Birth, Death, and Survival Theme Icon
The Importance of Nature in Indigenous Life Theme Icon
...still as Nanapush sees Fleur standing in the door of her cabin, and he knows Moses is also nearby. With the lumberjacks close behind, Eli among them, Eli tries to talk... (full context)