Train to Pakistan

by

Khushwant Singh

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Train to Pakistan can help.

Dacoity Term Analysis

An act of armed robbery. A ‘dacoit’ is a member of a gang who commits the act of armed robbery.

Dacoity Quotes in Train to Pakistan

The Train to Pakistan quotes below are all either spoken by Dacoity or refer to Dacoity. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Partition of India and Religious Warfare Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Grove Press edition of Train to Pakistan published in 1956.
1. Dacoity Quotes

“Yes, the Englishmen have gone but the rich Indians have taken their place. What have you or your fellow villagers got out of independence? More bread or more clothes? You are in the same handcuffs and fetters which the English put on you. We have to get together and rise. We have nothing to lose but these chains.” Iqbal emphasized the last sentence by raising his hands up to his face and jerking them as if the movement would break the handcuffs.

Page Number: 60
Explanation and Analysis:
2. Kalyug Quotes

“Toba, toba! Kill my own village banian? Babuji, who kills a hen which lays eggs? Besides, Ram Lal gave me money to pay lawyers when my father was in jail. I would not act like a bastard.”

“I suppose they will let you off now.”

“The police are the kings of the country. They will let me off when they feel like it. If they want to keep me in, they will trump up a case of keeping a spear without a license or going out of the village without permission—or just anything.”

Related Characters: Juggut Singh / Jugga (speaker), Iqbal Singh (speaker), Alam Singh, Lala Ram Lal, Malli
Page Number: 106
Explanation and Analysis:

It was not possible to keep Indians off the subject of sex for long. It obsessed their minds. It came out in their art, literature, and religion … One read it in the advertisements of quacks who proclaimed to possess remedies for barrenness and medicines to induce wombs to yield male children. One heard about it all the time … Conversation on any topic—politics, philosophy, sport—soon came down to sex, which everyone enjoyed with a lot of giggling and hand-slapping.

Page Number: 107
Explanation and Analysis:
3. Mano Majra Quotes

Muslims sat and moped in their houses. Rumors of atrocities committed by Sikhs on Muslims in Patiala, Ambala and Kapurthala, which they had heard and dismissed, came back to their minds. They had heard of gentlewomen having their veils taken off, being stripped and marched down crowded streets to be raped in the marketplace … They had heard of mosques being desecrated by the slaughter of pigs on the premises, and of copies of the holy Koran being torn up by infidels. Quite suddenly every Sikh in Mano Majra became a stranger with an evil intent … For the first time, the name Pakistan came to mean something to them—a haven of refuge where there were no Sikhs.

Related Symbols: Railway Bridge
Page Number: 120-121
Explanation and Analysis:

The Sikhs were sullen and angry. “Never trust a Mussulman,” they said. The last Guru had warned them that Muslims had no loyalties. He was right. All through the Muslim period of Indian history, sons had imprisoned or killed their own fathers and brothers had blinded brothers to get the throne. And what had they done to the Sikhs? Executed two of their Gurus, assassinated another and butchered his infant children; hundreds of thousands had been put to the sword for no other offense than refusing to accept Islam; their temples had been desecrated by the slaughter of kine; the holy Granth had been torn to bits. And Muslims were never ones to respect women. Sikh refugees had told of women jumping into wells and burning themselves rather than fall into the hands of Muslims. Those who did not commit suicide were paraded naked in the streets, raped in public, and then murdered. Now a trainload of Sikhs massacred by Muslims had been cremated in Mano Majra.

Related Symbols: Railway Bridge
Page Number: 121
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Train to Pakistan LitChart as a printable PDF.
Train to Pakistan PDF

Dacoity Term Timeline in Train to Pakistan

The timeline below shows where the term Dacoity appears in Train to Pakistan. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
1. Dacoity
The Partition of India and Religious Warfare Theme Icon
Postcolonial Anxiety and National Identity Theme Icon
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
Gender and Masculinity Theme Icon
In August 1947, five armed dacoits come out of a keekar grove near Mano Majra and are walking toward the Sutlej... (full context)
The Partition of India and Religious Warfare Theme Icon
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
Gender and Masculinity Theme Icon
For both Juggut Singh and the dacoits the sound of the goods train’s arrival is a signal. Jugga will only be gone... (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
On the morning before the dacoity, the rest house is cleaned, swept, dusted, and organized to receive an important guest. At... (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...they do nothing “but fleece people.” Talk of the police reminds Meet Singh of the dacoity. He gets up and says that he has to go to the moneylender’s house. The... (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
Honor and Heroism  Theme Icon
...priest has learned that the police have sent for Juggut to be arrested for the dacoity. Meet Singh is outraged that Juggut, who had run away, would loot a neighbor’s home.... (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...constables search the house. Jugga’s mother brings out the broken bangles as evidence that the dacoits attempted to frame Jugga. They believe that this means that he knows who the robbers... (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...arrest, suggesting that he is innocent. It is also unlikely that Juggut would commit a dacoity in his own village. It is also clear that Iqbal and Juggut do not know... (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
Honor and Heroism  Theme Icon
...of time in jail. Crime is his inheritance. When Alam Singh was convicted of a dacoity, Juggut’s mother mortgaged their land to pay lawyers. Jugga got money to get back the... (full context)
The Partition of India and Religious Warfare Theme Icon
Postcolonial Anxiety and National Identity Theme Icon
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...Lal’s murderers. He orders them to beat Juggut to get the names of the other dacoits, though the subinspector thinks that he can do it without any beatings. (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
Gender and Masculinity Theme Icon
...and goes to Juggut’s cell. He asks where Jugga was on the night of the dacoity. Jugga insists that he was not involved, but the subinspector does not believe him. The... (full context)
2. Kalyug
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...night of the robbery and Malli threw the bangles into Jugga’s courtyard after committing the dacoity. (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...puts Malli and Jugga in the same cell, the criminals would discuss the murder and dacoity and find a way to help each other. (full context)
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...though he does not know this and to suggest that the robber left after the dacoity. (full context)
3. Mano Majra
The Partition of India and Religious Warfare Theme Icon
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...uncuff them, knowing that Juggut Singh and Iqbal Singh (“the stranger”) did not commit the dacoity. They also think that, by arresting Malli and his gang, the police are on the... (full context)
The Partition of India and Religious Warfare Theme Icon
Power and Corruption Theme Icon
...Singh, it does not matter; he knows that the babu was not involved in the dacoity. He adds, more confidently, that Malli has been arrested for the dacoity and explains how... (full context)