Treasure Island

Squire Trelawney Character Analysis

A good friend of Dr. Livesey, Squire Trelawney is also present at the unveiling of the treasure map, and it is he who tells everyone just how frightening and powerful a pirate Captain Flint was known to be. It’s the squire who takes on ownership for the Hispaniola, and he does feel a great deal of responsibility for the voyage, but he can also be a little too wont to gossip and chatter. This leads Long John Silver (as well as many others at the Bristol port) to hear about the treasure hunt, giving him the chance to manipulate Trelawney such that much of the crew ends up being composed of pirates loyal to Silver.

Squire Trelawney Quotes in Treasure Island

The Treasure Island quotes below are all either spoken by Squire Trelawney or refer to Squire Trelawney. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Treasure Island published in 1999.
Chapter 12 Quotes

“Hawkins, I put prodigious faith in you,” added the squire.
I began to feel pretty desperate at this, for I felt altogether helpless; and yet, by an odd train of circumstances, it was indeed through me that safety came. In the meantime, talk as we pleased, there were only seven out of the twenty-six on whom we knew we could rely; and out of these seven one was a boy, so that the grown men on our side were six to their nineteen.

Related Characters: Jim Hawkins (speaker), Squire Trelawney (speaker)
Page Number: 66
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Treasure Island quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Get the entire Treasure Island LitChart as a printable PDF.
Treasure island.pdf.medium

Squire Trelawney Character Timeline in Treasure Island

The timeline below shows where the character Squire Trelawney appears in Treasure Island. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1. The Old Sea Dog at the “Admiral Benbow”
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
The narrator, Jim Hawkins, has been asked by a few men, including Squire Trelawney and Dr. Livesey, to write down all the details of their adventure to Treasure Island,... (full context)
Chapter 6. The Captain’s Papers
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Mr. Dance and Jim arrive to Dr. Livesey’s house, where Squire Trelawney, a tall, rough-faced man, is also sitting by the fire. Mr. Dance tells the story,... (full context)
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
First, though, they eat dinner, and the squire talks about Captain Flint, the most violent and bloodthirsty pirate of all time. Dr. Livesey... (full context)
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
Jim isn’t sure what all the fuss is about, but the squire and doctor are thrilled. Squire Trelawney cries that they’ll draw up a crew, bring Jim... (full context)
Chapter 7. I Go to Bristol
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
In March, Jim and Redruth receive a letter from the squire saying that the ship is ready, and that everyone in Bristol has been most helpful... (full context)
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...revels in the smell of tar and salt and in all the magnificent ships. The squire meets them and announces that they’ll be leaving the next day. (full context)
Chapter 8. At the Sign of the “Spy-glass”
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
After breakfast, the squire gives Jim a note addressed to Long John Silver and sends him to the tavern,... (full context)
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
...Silver explains the ins and outs of seafaring to Jim. When they arrive to the squire’s inn, Silver tells the story about Black Dog, and they all agree that there’s nothing... (full context)
Chapter 9. Powder and Arms
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
...with the crew, he adds. He suggests a number of changes he’d like, and the squire agrees cheerfully. (full context)
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
...they have a map of the island where the treasure chest’s location is marked. The squire cries that he never told anyone about this: Jim knows that he is a blabber,... (full context)
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
...captain barks at him to get to work, and Jim decides he agrees with the squire about Smollett. (full context)
Chapter 10. The Voyage
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Captain Smollett and Squire Trelawney fail to hide their mutual dislike. Still, the Hispaniola sails well, and most of the... (full context)
Chapter 11. What I Heard in the Apple Barrel
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...death, if only to prevent the chance of them testifying at trial later. He claims Trelawney for himself. Then he asks the young sailor for an apple. Jim is terrified he’ll... (full context)
Chapter 12. Council of War
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
...him. Jim goes to the doctor and asks him for a private conference with the squire and Smollett. Dr. Livesey agrees, but first the captain draws all the hands on deck... (full context)
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
Soon Jim is sent for and finds the squire, captain, and doctor in the cabin. He relates what he heard. The squire admits to... (full context)
Chapter 13. How My Shore Adventure Began
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...is the only cheerful one, as if he’s masking the others’ discontent. Jim, Smollett, the squire, and the doctor reconvene in the cabin that evening. Smollett proposes they allow the men... (full context)
Chapter 15. The Man of the Island
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
...telling him to find Flint’s money for himself. Now, Gunn asks Jim to tell the squire that Gunn is more a real gentleman than a “gentleman of fortune,” and that most... (full context)
Chapter 16. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: How the ship Was Abandoned
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
This section is narrated by Dr. Livesey, who describes how he, Smollett, and the squire wondered if they could conquer the six pirates left on the Hispaniola and sail off,... (full context)
Chapter 17. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: The Jolly-boat’s Last Trip
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
Smollett asks Trelawney to pick off Hands: he shoots, but just at that moment Hands stoops down, and... (full context)
Chapter 18. Narrative Continued by the Doctor: End of the First Day’s Fighting
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...servant, the oldest of the men aboard the ship, who is now to die. The squire asks Redruth to forgive him, and he does. He asks for a prayer to be... (full context)
Chapter 21. The Attack
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...the woods and towards the stockade. They hurl themselves over the fence, and as the squire and Gray fire, three of them fall (though one soon rises and flees). Then they... (full context)
Chapter 28. In the Enemy’s Camp
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
...“fools and cowards” of the pirates are now mutinying against him. He’s now on the squire’s side, he tells Jim. He imagines that Hands and O’Brien turned soft—he never much trusted... (full context)
Chapter 33. The Fall of a Chieftain
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...around the coast to North Inlet. Passing around the hill, they catch sight of the squire waiting outside Gunn’s cave. They finally reach the Hispaniola, which is in good shape, apart... (full context)
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
They climb to the cave and meet the squire, who treats Jim kindly and doesn’t mention his escapade. The squire tells Silver that he’s... (full context)
Chapter 34. And Last
Fortune and Greed Theme Icon
Father Figures and “Becoming a Man” Theme Icon
Deception, Secrecy, and Trust Theme Icon
Courage, Adventure, and Pragmatism Theme Icon
...port where Mexican Indians and black people are selling sweet-smelling fruits and vegetables. The doctor, squire, and Jim meet an English man-of-war and spend some time aboard his ship. When they... (full context)