Volpone

Bonario Character Analysis

Corbaccio’s son. Bonario’s name comes from the Italian word for “good,” and he represents goodness in the play. He is a valiant, morally righteous figure who maintains family values despite being disinherited by his father. Though Mosca attempts to manipulate him, Bonario is able to resist this manipulation more so than other characters in the play, and he courageously rescues Celia from Volpone’s attempted rape. In court, he refuses to lie, and he claims that truth will be his only testimony.

Bonario Quotes in Volpone

The Volpone quotes below are all either spoken by Bonario or refer to Bonario. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Publications edition of Volpone published in 2004.
Act 3, Scene 2 Quotes

This cannot be a personated passion.

Related Characters: Bonario (speaker), Mosca
Page Number: 3.2.35
Explanation and Analysis:
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Act 3, Scene 7 Quotes

Fall on me, roof, and bury me in ruin!
Become my grave, that wert my shelter! O!
I am unmask'd, unspirited, undone,
Betray'd to beggary, to infamy—

Related Characters: Volpone (speaker), Bonario, Celia
Page Number: 3.7.275-278
Explanation and Analysis:
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Act 4, Scene 5 Quotes

I would I could forget I were a creature.

Related Characters: Celia (speaker), Volpone, Voltore, Bonario, Corvino, Avocatori
Page Number: 4.5.102
Explanation and Analysis:
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Act 4, Scene 6 Quotes

I will conclude with this,
That vicious persons, when they're hot and flesh'd
In impious acts, their constancy abounds:
Damn'd deeds are done with greatest confidence.

Related Characters: Voltore (speaker), Volpone, Mosca, Bonario, Celia
Page Number: 4.6.50-53
Explanation and Analysis:
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Act 5, Scene 12 Quotes

Heaven could not long let such gross crimes be hid.

Related Characters: Bonario (speaker), Volpone, Mosca, Voltore, Corbaccio, Corvino
Page Number: 5.12.98
Explanation and Analysis:
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Bonario Character Timeline in Volpone

The timeline below shows where the character Bonario appears in Volpone. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 3, Scene 2
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Bonario walks into the street and Mosca recognizes him as Corbaccio’s son. Bonario, though, isn’t interested... (full context)
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...fortune, but he denies ever doing “base” or bad things for money. In an aside, Bonario remarks that Mosca’s speech can’t just be a “personated passion.” He apologizes again for calling... (full context)
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Mosca says that his business concerns Bonario, and though it might seem like he is doing a disservice to Volpone, he will... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 6
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In Volpone’s house, Mosca ushers Bonario to a hiding space to witness Corbaccio disinheriting Bonario. Alone, Bonario says he still doesn’t... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 7
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Corvino and Celia enter the room where Volpone is lying in bed and Bonario is hiding. Mosca intercepts Corvino and Celia, saying they have come too soon. Corvino says... (full context)
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While Corvino explains the situation to Celia, Mosca tells Bonario that Corbaccio isn’t to come for a half an hour. He tells Bonario to go... (full context)
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...or else he’ll force her. Celia cries out to God, and Volpone seizes her, but Bonario leaps out from his hiding place and curses out Volpone. Bonario tells Volpone to free... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 8
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...Volpone notes that Mosca is bleeding, and Mosca says that he has been wounded by Bonario. Volpone tells Mosca that Mosca has made him miserable, and Mosca says that he is... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 9
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Corbaccio enters and asks Mosca why he is bleeding. Mosca explains that Corbaccio’s son, Bonario, somehow found out that Corbaccio was going to disinherit him, and so he hurt Mosca... (full context)
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...Voltore would inherit an even greater fortune when Volpone dies. He explains that he brought Bonario in to witness Corbaccio naming Volpone heir in the hopes that Bonario would become violent... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 4
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...of law. Voltore says they’ve figured out how to manage the situation with Celia and Bonario, and Mosca confirms that they have all agreed on the lie they are going to... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 5
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Four Avocatori (judges) enter the court where Mosca, Voltore, Corbaccio, and Corvino have been talking. Bonario, Celia, the Notario, the Commendatori, and other officers also enter. The Avocatori say that the... (full context)
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When the Avocatori ask who Mosca is, Bonario says that Mosca is Volpone’s parasite. Bonario asks the court to force Volpone to appear.... (full context)
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...in her claims and her tears, and that she has had a secret affair with Bonario. He also says that Corvino has been an innocent and an extremely lenient husband. Voltore... (full context)
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After some interjections by the surprised Avocatori, Voltore continues his lengthy, verbose speech, accusing Bonario of entering Volpone’s home with the intention of killing Corbaccio and regaining his inheritance. When... (full context)
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An Avocatori asks what proof Voltore has, and Bonario says that they shouldn’t listen to Voltore’s “mercenary tongue.” Bonario also says that Voltore would... (full context)
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...testify, but Corbaccio cannot hear well, so he ends up only cursing out and disowning Bonario. Corvino is then called forward. Corvino calls Celia a whore, and says that she wants... (full context)
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...his grief, and they silence him. Mosca tells them that he received his wound from Bonario, who he says instructed Celia to accuse Volpone of rape. The Avocatori begin to doubt... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 6
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...apologizes at length if she has been dishonorable or offensive in court. The Avocatori ask Bonario and Celia what witnesses they have to their defense, and they say only their consciences... (full context)
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...diseased and disabled. Voltore says that he will offer testimony that will silence Celia and Bonario. He points to Volpone and asks the court if the sickly man could possibly have... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 10
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The Avocatori, the Notario, Bonario, Celia, Corbaccio, Corvino, and Commandatori all enter the courtroom. They note that Voltore is missing,... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 12
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...the new information provided to them in Voltore’s statement, which appears to exonerate Celia and Bonario. Voltore’s story concedes that Bonario was wronged and that Celia was forced to Volpone’s home... (full context)
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The Avocatori say that now everything makes sense to them. They release Celia and Bonario, and Bonario says that “heaven could not let such gross crimes be hid.” The Avocatori,... (full context)