Washington Square

Dr. Austin Sloper Character Analysis

The antagonist of the novel, Dr. Sloper is a renowned New York City doctor and Catherine Sloper’s father. A witty, clever man of about fifty, Dr. Sloper lives in a new, modern house in fashionable Washington Square, and he moves among the highest social circles. He fell in love with Catherine Harrington as a young man, and her substantial marriage dowry helped him establish his successful medical practice. They had a very happy, albeit brief, marriage. After both his three-year-old son and Mrs. Sloper die—losses from which Dr. Sloper never recovers—Dr. Sloper is left with his daughter, the dowdy Catherine, who is a disappointment to him from the beginning. With the exception of his dazzling late wife, Dr. Sloper does not have a high opinion of the intelligence or abilities of women in general. He always speaks to Catherine in an ironic manner that goes over her head. From the beginning, Dr. Sloper suspects Morris Townsend of having mercenary designs upon his daughter and thinks he has a vulgar, over-familiar nature. He is confident that, based on Catherine’s respect for him as her father, she will ultimately reject Morris’s proposal of marriage. When Catherine stands firm, he takes her to Europe for a year and chillingly confronts her one evening while they’re touring the Alps. However, Catherine is unmoved and never again idealizes her father. Even after Catherine and Morris break their engagement, Dr. Sloper reduces Catherine’s inheritance to guard against other fortune-hunters. He and Catherine are emotionally estranged until he dies.

Dr. Austin Sloper Quotes in Washington Square

The Washington Square quotes below are all either spoken by Dr. Austin Sloper or refer to Dr. Austin Sloper. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Washington Square published in 2010.
Chapter 1 Quotes

For a man whose trade was to keep people alive he had certainly done poorly in his own family; and a bright doctor who within three years loses his wife and his little boy should perhaps be prepared to see either his skill or his affection impugned. Our friend, however, escaped criticism: that is, he escaped all criticism but his own, which was much the most competent and most formidable. He walked under the weight of this very private censure for the rest of his days, and bore forever the scars of a castigation to which the strongest hand he knew had treated him on the night that followed his wife’s death.

Page Number: 5
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Chapter 2 Quotes

Save when he fell in love with Catherine Harrington, he had never been dazzled, indeed, by any feminine characteristics whatever; and though he was to a certain extent what is called a ladies’ doctor, his private opinion of the more complicated sex was not exalted. He regarded its complications as more curious than edifying, and he had an idea of the beauty of reason, which was on the whole meagrely gratified by what he observed in his female patients. His wife had been a reasonable woman, but she was a bright exception; among several things that he was sure of, this was perhaps the principal. Such a conviction, of course, did little either to mitigate or to abbreviate his widowhood; and it set a limit to his recognition, at the best, of Catherine’s possibilities and of Mrs. Penniman’s ministrations.

Page Number: 7
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Chapter 3 Quotes

Her great indulgence of it was really the desire of a rather inarticulate nature to manifest itself; she sought to be eloquent in her garments, and to make up for her diffidence of speech by a fine frankness of costume. But if she expressed herself in her clothes it is certain that people were not to blame for not thinking her a witty person. It must be added that though she had the expectation of a fortune—Dr. Sloper for a long time had been making twenty thousand dollars a year by his profession and laying aside the half of it—the amount of money at her disposal was not greater than the allowance made to many poorer girls. In those days in New York there were still a few altar-fires flickering in the temple of Republican simplicity, and Dr. Sloper would have been glad to see his daughter present herself, with a classic grace, as a priestess of this mild faith. It made him fairly grimace, in private, to think that a child of his should be both ugly and overdressed. For himself, he was fond of the good things of life, and he made a considerable use of them; but he had a dread of vulgarity and even a theory that it was increasing in the society that surrounded him.

Related Characters: Catherine Sloper, Dr. Austin Sloper
Page Number: 11
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Chapter 7 Quotes

“He is not what I call a gentleman. He has not the soul of one. He is extremely insinuating; but it's a vulgar nature. I saw through it in a minute. He is altogether too familiar—I hate familiarity. He is a plausible coxcomb.”

“Ah, well,” said Mrs. Almond; ‘if you make up your mind so easily, it’s a great advantage.”

“I don’t make up my mind easily. What I tell you is the result of thirty years of observation; and in order to be able to form that judgment in a single evening, I have had to spend a lifetime in study.”

“Very possibly you are right. But the thing is for Catherine to see it.”

“I will present her with a pair of spectacles!” said the Doctor.

Related Characters: Dr. Austin Sloper (speaker), Aunt Elizabeth Almond (speaker), Catherine Sloper, Morris Townsend
Page Number: 35
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Chapter 12 Quotes

“And therefore, you mean, I am mercenary—I only want your daughter’s money.”

“I don’t say that. I am not obliged to say it; and to say it, save under stress of compulsion, would be very bad taste. I say simply that you belong to the wrong category.”

“But your daughter doesn’t marry a category,” Townsend urged, with his handsome smile. “She marries an individual—an individual whom she is so good as to say she loves.”

“An individual who offers so little in return!”

“Is it possible to offer more than the most tender affection and a lifelong devotion?” the young man demanded.

“It depends how we take it. It is possible to offer a few other things besides, and not only is it possible, but it’s usual. A lifelong devotion is measured after the fact; and meanwhile it is customary in these cases to give a few material securities. What are yours? A very handsome face and figure, and a very good manner. They are excellent as far as they go, but they don’t go far enough.”

Related Characters: Dr. Austin Sloper (speaker), Morris Townsend (speaker), Catherine Sloper
Page Number: 56
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Chapter 14 Quotes

The Doctor eyed her a moment. “You women are all the same! But the type to which your brother belongs was made to be the ruin of you, and you were made to be its handmaids and victims. The sign of the type in question is the determination—sometimes terrible in its quiet intensity—to accept nothing of life but its pleasures, and to secure these pleasures chiefly by the aid of your complaisant sex. Young men of this class never do anything for themselves that they can get other people to do for them, and it is the infatuation, the devotion, the superstition of others, that keeps them going. These others in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred are women. What our young friends chiefly insist upon is that someone else shall suffer for them; and women do that sort of thing, as you must know, wonderfully well.” The Doctor paused a moment, and then he added abruptly, “You have suffered immensely for your brother!”

Page Number: 66
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Chapter 15 Quotes

She only had an idea that if she should be very good, the situation would in some mysterious manner improve. To be good, she must be patient, respectful, abstain from judging her father too harshly, and from committing any act of open defiance. […] She could not imagine herself imparting any kind of knowledge to her father, there was something superior even in his injustice and absolute in his mistakes. But she could at least be good, and if she were only good enough. Heaven would invent some way of reconciling all things—the dignity of her father’s errors and the sweetness of her own confidence, the strict performance of her filial duties and the enjoyment of Morris Townsend’s affection.

Page Number: 72
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Mrs. Penniman’s real hope was that the girl would make a secret marriage, at which she should officiate as brideswoman or duenna. She had a vision of this ceremony being performed in some subterranean chapel—subterranean chapels in New York were not frequent, but Mrs. Penniman’s imagination was not chilled by trifles—and of the guilty couple—she liked to think of poor Catherine and her suitor as the guilty couple—being shuffled away in a fastwhirling vehicle to some obscure lodging in the suburbs, where she would pay them (in a thick veil) clandestine visits, where they would endure a period of romantic privation, and where ultimately, after she should have been their earthly providence, their intercessor, their advocate, and their medium of communication with the world, they should be reconciled to her brother in an artistic tableau, in which she herself should be somehow the central figure. She hesitated as yet to recommend this course to Catherine, but she attempted to draw an attractive picture of it to Morris Townsend.

Page Number: 72
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Chapter 18 Quotes

Catherine sat alone by the parlour fire—sat there for more than an hour, lost in her meditations. Her aunt seemed to her aggressive and foolish, and to see it so clearly—to judge Mrs. Penniman so positively—made her feel old and grave. She did not resent the imputation of weakness; it made no impression on her, for she had not the sense of weakness, and she was not hurt at not being appreciated. She had an immense respect for her father, and she felt that to displease him would be a misdemeanour analogous to an act of profanity in a great temple: but her purpose had slowly ripened, and she believed that her prayers had purified it of its violence. The evening advanced, and the lamp burned dim without her noticing it; her eyes were fixed upon her terrible plan.

Page Number: 85
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Chapter 21 Quotes

“[…] The two things are extremely mixed up, and the mixture is extremely odd. It will produce some third element, and that’s what I am waiting to see. I wait with suspense—with positive excitement; and that is a sort of emotion that I didn’t suppose Catherine would ever provide for me. I am really very much obliged to her.”

“She will cling,” said Mrs. Almond; “she will certainly cling.”

“Yes; as I say, she will stick.”

“Cling is prettier. That’s what those very simple natures always do, and nothing could be simpler than Catherine. She doesn’t take many impressions; but when she takes one she keeps it. She is like a copper kettle that receives a dent; you may polish up the kettle, but you can’t efface the mark.”

“We must try and polish up Catherine,” said the Doctor. “I will take her to Europe.”

Related Characters: Dr. Austin Sloper (speaker), Aunt Elizabeth Almond (speaker), Catherine Sloper
Page Number: 100
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Chapter 22 Quotes

“I sometimes think that if I do what you dislike so much, I ought not to stay with you.”

“To stay with me?”

“If I live with you, I ought to obey you.”

“If that’s your theory, it’s certainly mine,” said the Doctor, with a dry laugh.

“But if I don’t obey you, I ought not to live with you—to enjoy your kindness and protection.”

This striking argument gave the Doctor a sudden sense of having underestimated his daughter; it seemed even more than worthy of a young woman who had revealed the quality of unaggressive obstinacy. But it displeased him—displeased him deeply, and he signified as much. “That idea is in very bad taste,” he said. “Did you get it from Mr. Townsend?”

“Oh no; it’s my own!” said Catherine eagerly.

“Keep it to yourself, then,” her father answered, more than ever determined she should go to Europe.

Related Characters: Catherine Sloper (speaker), Dr. Austin Sloper (speaker), Morris Townsend
Page Number: 107
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Chapter 23 Quotes

Her father’s displeasure had cost the girl, as we know, a great deal of deep-welling sorrow—sorrow of the purest and most generous kind, without a touch of resentment or rancour; but for the first time, after he had dismissed with such contemptuous brevity her apology for being a charge upon him, there was a spark of anger in her grief. She had felt his contempt; it had scorched her; that speech about her bad taste made her ears burn for three days. During this period she was less considerate; she had an idea—a rather vague one, but it was agreeable to her sense of injury—that now she was absolved from penance, and might do what she chose. She chose to write to Morris Townsend to meet her in the Square and take her to walk about the town. If she were going to Europe out of respect to her father, she might at least give herself this satisfaction. She felt in every way at present more free and more resolute; there was a force that urged her. Now at last, completely and unreservedly, her passion possessed her.

Page Number: 108
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Chapter 24 Quotes

After a while the Doctor descried a footpath which, leading through a transverse valley, would bring them out, as he justly supposed, at a much higher point of the ascent. They followed this devious way and finally lost the path; the valley proved very wild and rough, and their walk became rather a scramble. […] Then, abruptly, in a low tone, he asked her an unexpected question—“Have you given him up?”

The question was unexpected, but Catherine was only superficially unprepared. “No, father!” she answered.

He looked at her again, for some moments, without speaking. “Does he write to you?” he asked.

“Yes—about twice a month.”

The Doctor looked up and down the valley, swinging his stick; then he said to her, in the same low tone—“I am very angry.”

She wondered what he meant—whether he wished to frighten her. If he did, the place was well chosen; this hard, melancholy dell, abandoned by the summer light, made her feel her loneliness.

Related Characters: Catherine Sloper (speaker), Dr. Austin Sloper (speaker), Morris Townsend
Related Symbols: The Alps
Page Number: 114
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Chapter 25 Quotes

“You were angry last year that I wouldn’t marry immediately, and now you talk about my winning my father over. You told me it would serve him right if he should take me to Europe for nothing. Well, he has taken me for nothing, and you ought to be satisfied. Nothing is changed—nothing but my feeling about father. I don’t mind nearly so much now. I have been as good as I could, but he doesn’t care. Now I don’t care either. I don’t know whether I have grown bad; perhaps I have. But I don’t care for that. I have come home to be married—that’s all I know. That ought to please you, unless you have taken up some new idea; you are so strange. You may do as you please; but you must never speak to me again about pleading with father. I shall never plead with him for anything; that is all over. He has put me off. I am come home to be married.”

Page Number: 122
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Chapter 26 Quotes

“I wouldn’t say such a thing without being sure. I saw it, I felt it, in England, just before he came away. He talked to me one night—the last night; and then it came over me. You can tell when a person feels that way. I wouldn’t accuse him if he hadn’t made me feel that way. I don’t accuse him; I just tell you that that’s how it is. He can’t help it; we can’t govern our affections. Do I govern mine? mightn’t he say that to me? It’s because he is so fond of my mother, whom we lost so long ago. She was beautiful, and very, very brilliant; he is always thinking of her. I am not at all like her; Aunt Penniman has told me that. Of course it isn’t my fault; but neither is it his fault. All I mean is, it’s true; and it’s a stronger reason for his never being reconciled than simply his dislike for you.”

Page Number: 125
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Chapter 28 Quotes

[…] [S]he had accustomed herself to the thought that, if Morris should decidedly not be able to get her brother’s money, it would not do for him to marry Catherine without it. […] She had grown first to regard [this idea] with an emotion which she flattered herself was philosophic, and then to have a secret tenderness for it. The fact that she kept her tenderness secret proves, of course, that she was ashamed of it […] In the first place, Morris must get the money, and she would help him to it. In the second, it was plain it would never come to him, and it would be a grievous pity he should marry without it—a young man who might so easily find something better. After her brother had delivered himself, on his return from Europe, of that incisive little address that has been quoted, Morris’s cause seemed so hopeless that Mrs. Penniman fixed her attention exclusively upon the latter branch of her argument. If Morris had been her son, she would certainly have sacrificed Catherine to a superior conception of his future; and to be ready to do so as the case stood was therefore even a finer degree of devotion. Nevertheless, it checked her breath a little to have the sacrificial knife, as it were, suddenly thrust into her hand.

Page Number: 132
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Chapter 32 Quotes

Catherine, at the time of these events, had left her thirtieth year well behind her, and had quite taken her place as an old maid. Her father would have preferred she should marry, and he once told her that he hoped she would not be too fastidious. […] Catherine, however, became an admirable old maid. She formed habits, regulated her days upon a system of her own, interested herself in charitable institutions, asylums, hospitals, and aid-societies, and went generally, with an even and noiseless step, about the rigid business of her life.

Related Characters: Catherine Sloper, Dr. Austin Sloper
Page Number: 157
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From her own point of view the great facts of her career were that Morris Townsend had trifled with her affection, and that her father had broken its spring. Nothing could ever alter these facts; they were always there, like her name, her age, her plain face. Nothing could ever undo the wrong or cure the pain that Morris had inflicted on her, and nothing could ever make her feel towards her father as she felt in her younger years. There was something dead in her life, and her duty was to try and fill the void.

Page Number: 158
Explanation and Analysis:
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Dr. Austin Sloper Character Timeline in Washington Square

The timeline below shows where the character Dr. Austin Sloper appears in Washington Square. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Class, Wealth, and Social Status Theme Icon
Reason, Romanticism, and Blind Spots Theme Icon
In New York City in the 1840s, a physician named Dr. Austin Sloper flourished. In America, “you must either earn your income or make believe that you earn... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper is a clever man, and because of this has become a local celebrity. He is... (full context)
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The Slopers’ first child, a promising little boy, died at age three, despite Dr. Sloper ’s best medical efforts. Two years later, Mrs. Catherine Harrington Sloper gave birth to a... (full context)
Chapter 2
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When Catherine is about 10, Dr. Sloper invites his sister, Lavinia Penniman, who has been left a childless widow, to stay with... (full context)
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...obedient, modest, and truthful. She is not exceptionally clever and doesn’t shine socially. She idolizes Dr. Sloper , both adoring and fearing him and desiring nothing more than to please him, which... (full context)
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By the time Catherine is 18, Dr. Sloper has largely reconciled himself to his disappointment in his daughter and imagines that she will... (full context)
Chapter 3
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...wardrobe—“[making] up for her diffidence of speech by a fine frankness of costume.” This embarrasses Dr. Sloper , who would prefer that his daughter dress in a manner befitting “Republican simplicity.” For... (full context)
Chapter 4
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Later, when Dr. Sloper asks Catherine if she has enjoyed the party, Catherine “dissembles” for a second time, saying... (full context)
Chapter 6
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That night, Dr. Sloper teases Catherine, asking her if Morris proposed to her that day. Catherine wishes she had... (full context)
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...earnest.” Mrs. Almond thinks that Morris might well be genuinely interested in Catherine and that Dr. Sloper “[has] never done Catherine justice.” Dr. Sloper points out that Catherine is unattractive and has... (full context)
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...been married. She suggests that, someday, a man of 40 will be delighted with Catherine. Dr. Sloper has little to say to this, but wonders about Morris’s means of supporting himself, as... (full context)
Chapter 7
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Dr. Sloper , however, is “more than anything else amused” by the possibility of his daughter having... (full context)
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The dinner takes place a few days later. Morris admires Dr. Sloper ’s good wine, and Dr. Sloper admires Morris’s innate abilities; however, he doesn’t like Morris... (full context)
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Later, when Dr. Sloper talks with Mrs. Almond, he says that Catherine will have to get over her feelings... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...Though she is in love, she has “only a consciousness of immense and unexpected favors.” Dr. Sloper wishes to give Catherine her liberty, but is nevertheless annoyed by her secrecy and Aunt... (full context)
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...has been betrayed by false friends. She claims he’s “earnestly” searching for a position, and Dr. Sloper retorts that he’s looking for one in the Slopers’ front parlor—“the position of husband of... (full context)
Chapter 9
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...house, the Slopers are visiting their relatives, and Morris joins the party. Catherine, aware that Dr. Sloper doesn’t like Morris, shrinks from his gaze as Morris sits by her, and Dr. Sloper... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper wonders if perhaps he hasn’t given Morris enough of a chance and starts a conversation... (full context)
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...to say to her. He explains that he can’t enter the Slopers’ house again because Dr. Sloper has insulted his poverty. Catherine replies that she doesn’t care who sees them and that... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...dreads the prospect of a conflict with her father. She says she will speak to Dr. Sloper first, since she’s able to be more tactful and conciliating. Morris warns her that Dr.... (full context)
Chapter 11
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That evening Catherine goes to Dr. Sloper ’s study and tells him that she is engaged to Morris. Dr. Sloper observes that... (full context)
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Catherine says that Dr. Sloper thinks Morris “mercenary,” and Dr. Sloper concedes that this is true, since Morris has already... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Dr. Sloper remains at home the next day in anticipation of Morris’s visit. He tells Morris that... (full context)
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Morris acknowledges that he knows Dr. Sloper doesn’t like him. Dr. Sloper agrees that, in view of Morris’s being a son-in-law, he... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper goes on to say that it would be “in bad taste” to call Morris “mercenary,”... (full context)
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Morris and Dr. Sloper continue to go back and forth about Morris’s past dealings with money and their possible... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Dr. Sloper has spent his entire medical career making quick estimations of people, and 19 times out... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper continues to rely on the belief that Catherine’s longstanding admiration for him will win out... (full context)
Chapter 14
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Dr. Sloper meets with Morris’s sister, Mrs. Montgomery, at her house, whose exterior suggests she is a... (full context)
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Mrs. Montgomery thinks for a while and asks what makes Dr. Sloper dislike her brother Morris so much. He explains that although Morris seems like excellent company,... (full context)
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When Mrs. Montgomery hesitantly admits that her brother can be selfish, Dr. Sloper says, “You women are all the same! But the type to which your brother belongs... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper imagines that Mrs. Montgomery has “suffered immensely” because of her brother, and she admits this.... (full context)
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Almost in tears, Mrs. Montgomery resists Dr. Sloper ’s pressure to speak ill of Morris’s character, but she finally bursts out with, “Don’t... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Dr. Sloper is puzzled and almost disappointed by Catherine’s passive, unemotional response to his rejection of her... (full context)
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Catherine obeys Dr. Sloper ’s orders not to see Morris, but she exchanges letters with him. She asks Morris... (full context)
Chapter 16
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...secret meeting with Morris at the oyster saloon, Aunt Penniman tries to convince him that Dr. Sloper will never be reconciled to his romance with Catherine; he must marry Catherine first and... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...Aunt Penniman asks why Catherine seems so “cold” and, in light of Catherine’s fear of Dr. Sloper , whether she means to give Morris up. Catherine, vexed, asks her aunt why she... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...but she believes she must follow through on her “terrible plan.” When she goes to Dr. Sloper ’s study, at first she’s unable to speak, but finally she admits that she has... (full context)
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To Catherine’s surprise, Dr. Sloper greets her confession with an embrace. He explains that if she wishes to make him... (full context)
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...character, but she has exhausted her arguments. She says she will see Morris once, and Dr. Sloper tells her that will make her “an ungrateful, cruel child” who will have given “your... (full context)
Chapter 19
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The next day Dr. Sloper speaks with Aunt Penniman, saying that anything she does by way of “giving [Catherine] aid... (full context)
Chapter 20
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...He asks Catherine if she will marry him at once, and Catherine haltingly hopes that Dr. Sloper might yet come around to accepting Morris. Morris suggests that Catherine’s fear of Dr. Sloper... (full context)
Chapter 21
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Aunt Almond finds Dr. Sloper cold-blooded in his amusement at Catherine’s determination to “stick.” Dr. Sloper says that he has... (full context)
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Aunt Penniman meets with Morris again in secret with the advice that, in light of Dr. Sloper ’s narrow-mindedness, Morris should “watch and wait” instead of marrying immediately. Morris wryly observes that... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...a private wedding. He doesn’t want to risk losing Catherine and her possible fortune from Dr. Sloper altogether, but he also doesn’t want to act too quickly and find that there’s no... (full context)
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...her.” Catherine’s conscience is also stricken by the fact that she continues to live under Dr. Sloper ’s roof while violating his wishes. Catherine’s attitude is mixed with “a merely instinctive penitence.” (full context)
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After a period of tension in the Slopers’ home, Dr. Sloper tells Catherine to put off her marriage for six months; he would like to take... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Dr. Sloper ’s contemptuous dismissal of Catherine’s words cause, for the first time, “a spark of anger... (full context)
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...hosts Morris at Washington Square. He enjoys a favorite chair by the fireside and smokes Dr. Sloper ’s good cigars; “as a young man of luxurious tastes and scanty resources, he found... (full context)
Chapter 24
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During their first six months abroad, Dr. Sloper says nothing about his daughter’s engagement, and she is his “docile and reasonable associate” throughout... (full context)
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One day, toward the end of the summer, Dr. Sloper and Catherine are hiking in a remote Alpine pass and lose their way. Abruptly, Dr.... (full context)
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Catherine wonders if Dr. Sloper has had some plan in bringing her here—either to frighten her by the remote Alpine... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper reiterates that he is furious. He says that if Catherine marries Morris, she will be... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper says nothing more of the incident for another six months, until they’re in Liverpool, the... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...her  superior knowledge of her fiancé, and to hear that Morris used to sit in Dr. Sloper ’s study. She is delighted, however, to learn that Morris has just gotten a job... (full context)
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Aunt Penniman asks whether Catherine succeeded in her efforts to sway Dr. Sloper while they were abroad, and Catherine explains that although this had been Morris’s plan, she... (full context)
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...could be, and it has made no difference; she will no longer strive to please Dr. Sloper . This is “a more authoritative speech” than Aunt Penniman has ever heard from Catherine,... (full context)
Chapter 26
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...that they must expect for her to be disinherited. Morris suggests that he try persuading Dr. Sloper , as he has developed “more tact” over the past year. He explains that it’s... (full context)
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...[…] I am not at all like her.” She adds that she feels “separated” from Dr. Sloper and no longer minds his antipathy toward her or Morris so much. (full context)
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...this way, after having “worshipped” him before. She will never ask or expect anything from Dr. Sloper again. (full context)
Chapter 27
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Dr. Sloper complains to Aunt Almond that Catherine has come home as immovable as he is on... (full context)
Chapter 28
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When Aunt Penniman meets with Morris again, Morris says that, in light of Dr. Sloper ’s immovable attitude, he must “know when he is beaten” and give Catherine up. Aunt... (full context)
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...explaining that he’s acting this way because he can’t bear to step between her and Dr. Sloper . Aunt Penniman urges him nevertheless to come back for a last parting, though Morris... (full context)
Chapter 31
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...can remain friends. Catherine says nothing to her father about these developments. A week later, Dr. Sloper finally confronts Catherine, wanting to know when she will be married. Catherine explains that she’s... (full context)
Chapter 32
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As time goes on, Catherine remains “deeply and incurably wounded,” but Dr. Sloper has no way of knowing this—“his punishment […] for the abuse of sarcasm in his... (full context)
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...Nothing can undo the pain of the former, and nothing can restore her admiration for Dr. Sloper ; it’s up to Catherine to “fill the void” in her life. She readily does... (full context)
Chapter 33
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Dr. Sloper eventually retires, and one day, to Catherine’s surprise, he asks her to promise that she... (full context)
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Dr. Sloper later catches a severe cold and dies of congestion of the lungs when he’s about... (full context)