Weep Not, Child

by

Ngugi wa Thiong’o

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Weep Not, Child can help.
Njoroge’s older half-brother, and one of Njeri’s sons. Kori is a gifted storyteller who often brings news home from Nairobi, where he becomes increasingly involved in political resistance. Indeed, it is Kori who often tells tales of Jomo Kenyatta—stories that rouse Njoroge and his family members. Kori eventually joins the Mau Mau, along with Boro. Because of this, Jacobo decides to detain him by capturing him when he accidentally breaks curfew with Njeri one night. And although the government quickly releases Njeri after Ngotho’s family pays the necessary fines, they keep Kori in prison, and Njoroge fears at the end of the novel that he be killed in detention.

Kori Quotes in Weep Not, Child

The Weep Not, Child quotes below are all either spoken by Kori or refer to Kori. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of Weep Not, Child published in 1964.
Chapter 10 Quotes

Was he a man any longer, he who had watched his wife and son taken away because of breaking the curfew without a word of protest? Was this cowardice? It was cowardice, cowardice of the worst sort. He stood up and rushed to the door like a madman. It was too late. He came back to his seat, a defeated man, a man who cursed himself for being a man with a lost manhood. He now knew that even that waiting had been a form of cowardice, putting off of action.

Related Characters: Ngotho, Njeri, Kori
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Weep Not, Child LitChart as a printable PDF.
Weep Not, Child PDF

Kori Character Timeline in Weep Not, Child

The timeline below shows where the character Kori appears in Weep Not, Child. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
...with his family to listen to stories. Included in this group are his older brothers, Kori and Boro. “Boro, who had been to the war, did not know many tribal stories,”... (full context)
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Land Ownership and Power Theme Icon
On this particular night, many family members are present. “Boro, Kori, and Kamau were all sons of Njeri, Ngotho’s eldest wife,” Ngũgĩ writes. “Njoroge’s only true... (full context)
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
Land Ownership and Power Theme Icon
...spent his time working for Mr. Howlands, “waiting for the prophecy to be fulfilled.” When Kori asks if he thinks this will ever actually happen, though, Ngotho says he doesn’t know.... (full context)
Chapter 5
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
Land Ownership and Power Theme Icon
Boro and Kori leave home to live in Nairobi. After their departure, Kamau and Njoroge contemplate what it... (full context)
Chapter 6
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
When Kori and Boro visit home, they bring friends from Nairobi—friends who are politically active and passionate... (full context)
Chapter 7
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
...raise, and so he gives his brother his extra earnings. In conjunction with money that Kori lends him, Njoroge is able to return to school. (full context)
Chapter 8
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Pride and Honor vs. Guilt and Shame Theme Icon
...as he greets his brother. “I don’t know,” Boro answers, referring to the fact that Kori has been captured by white settlers. Apparently, Boro was also captured but managed to escape.... (full context)
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Pride and Honor vs. Guilt and Shame Theme Icon
...happened to her sons, Njeri says, “Why do they oppress the black people?” In response, Kori says that the white settlers want to “oppress people” before Jomo’s trial, since “they know... (full context)
Chapter 9
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
Pride and Honor vs. Guilt and Shame Theme Icon
That night, news reaches Njoroge’s village that Jomo has lost his trial. Kori explains that the entire hearing was rigged, and Ngotho becomes afraid of the fact that... (full context)
Chapter 10
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
...Boro—“are bringing trouble in the village.” As such, he suggests that they arrest Boro and Kori because this would make it easier to “keep an eye on” Ngotho, who Jacobo upholds... (full context)
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Pride and Honor vs. Guilt and Shame Theme Icon
Late that night, Ngotho sits in Nyokabi’s hut. Eventually, Kori and Njeri retire to Njeri’s hut, and as they do so, police officers tell them... (full context)
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Pride and Honor vs. Guilt and Shame Theme Icon
...breaking curfew isn’t a serious infraction, Njeri is released after her family pays a fine. Kori, however, is not. Instead, he’s sent to a detention camp “without trial.” Despite this outcome,... (full context)
Chapter 11
Division and Conquest Theme Icon
Violence and Revenge Theme Icon
Hope, Progress, and Disillusionment Theme Icon
After Kori is arrested, things only get worse. “No one could tell when he might be arrested... (full context)