Welcome to Our Hillbrow

by

Phaswane Mpe

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Welcome to Our Hillbrow can help.

The Nigerian Man Character Analysis

The young Nigerian man is a student at Oxford Brookes University and meets Refilwe at a bar while she is studying abroad. He looks just like Refentše, which is initially what attracts Refilwe to him, and the two become lovers. He, like Refilwe, is diagnosed with AIDS while abroad in England (though, just like Refilwe, he’d been HIV-positive for a long time). He doesn’t want to burden Refilwe, so rather than return to Tiragalong with her, he flies home to Lagos after the program ends.

The Nigerian Man Quotes in Welcome to Our Hillbrow

The Welcome to Our Hillbrow quotes below are all either spoken by The Nigerian Man or refer to The Nigerian Man. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Regret and Redemption Theme Icon
).
Chapter 5 Quotes

Refentše knew only too well that Refilwe as going to bear the brunt of their wrath when she went back to Tiragalong. These gods and devils of our Tiragalong would say:

So, you thought the ones in Johannesburg were not bad enough! You had to import a worse example for yourself!

They would say this, because the stranger-with-Refentše’s-face that Refilwe met in our Jude the Obscure was a Nigerian in search of green pastures in our Oxford. He and Refilwe did find some green pastures in each other’s embraces that following Wednesday evening. They had Refentše’s blessing. His only wish was that he owned life, so that he could force those on Earth to give the lovers their blessings too.

Related Characters: Refilwe, Refentše , The Nigerian Man
Page Number: 112
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

But she also knew in her heart that she was finished already. When she and her Nigerian were told that they had AIDS, they were also given to know that they had both been HIV-positive for a long time. Refilwe, in particular, must have been infected for a decade or so. Except that she had not known that. So when the disease struck, it seemed that it came suddenly, with no warning.

Related Characters: Refilwe, The Nigerian Man
Page Number: 117
Explanation and Analysis:
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Welcome to Our Hillbrow PDF

The Nigerian Man Character Timeline in Welcome to Our Hillbrow

The timeline below shows where the character The Nigerian Man appears in Welcome to Our Hillbrow. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 5
Regret and Redemption Theme Icon
One night at Jude the Obscure, Refilwe sees a man that looks almost exactly like Refentše (just with slightly darker skin). This shocks her to... (full context)
Regret and Redemption Theme Icon
Prejudice and Ignorance  Theme Icon
The next week, at Jude the Obscure, Refilwe sees the same man (“the stranger-whose-face-was-Refentše’s”). Refilwe is completely drawn to him. She approaches him, daring to start up... (full context)
Prejudice and Ignorance  Theme Icon
...import a worse example for yourself!” He knows that, even as Refilwe and the Nigerian man enjoy themselves and find happiness in each other’s arms, their story will not end well.... (full context)
Chapter 6
Regret and Redemption Theme Icon
Prejudice and Ignorance  Theme Icon
...Africa when she finishes her program. However, she is succumbing to AIDS. When the Nigerian man, her lover, found out about his diagnosis, he went back to Lagos. He would have... (full context)
Prejudice and Ignorance  Theme Icon
Refilwe remembers the moment that she and her lover, the Nigerian man, were told they had AIDS. Apparently, they’d both been HIV-positive for a long time. Refilwe,... (full context)
Regret and Redemption Theme Icon
Prejudice and Ignorance  Theme Icon
...She does not care, since she mostly thinks about her two loves: Refentše, and the man who looked like Refentše. It is as though Tiragalong and Nigeria are “blended without distinction”... (full context)