Whistling Vivaldi

Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the W. W. Norton & Company edition of Whistling Vivaldi published in 2011.
Chapter 1 Quotes

I have a memory of the first time I realized I was black. It was when, at seven or eight, I was walking home from school with neighborhood kids on the last day of the school year—the whole summer in front of us—and I learned that we "black" kids couldn't swim at the pool in our area park, except on Wednesday afternoons.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Swimming Pool
Page Number: 1
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Whistling Vivaldi quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!

Whistling Vivaldi is about the experience of living under such a cloud—an experience we all have—and the role such clouds play in shaping our lives and society.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 2 Quotes

Among students with comparable academic skills, as measured by the SAT, black students got less of a return on those skills in college than other students. Something was suppressing the yield they got from their skills.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

On the second day Ms. Elliott turned the tables. She put the felt collars around the necks of the blue-eyed students and treated them the same way she'd treated the brown-eyed students the day before. The blue-eyed students now lost the energy they'd had the day before and behaved the way the brown-eyed students had on that day, huddled and downcast. The brown-eyed students, for their part, were once again eager learners.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Jane Elliott
Page Number: 27
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Steve Spencer and I weren't especially interested in the genetic explanation of sex differences in math. Our idea was that stigma had more to do with these differences than people commonly thought. But we knew, long before the Summers episode, that the genetic question carried huge cultural weight.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Steven Spencer, Larry Summers
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 3 Quotes

It's conventional wisdom, a virtual stereotype of what causes members of negatively regarded groups to fail. So if something causes black and women college students to perform less well than you'd expect from their skills, it must be—the idea goes—these psychic deficiencies, deficiencies of confidence and expectation, self-sabotaging deficiencies.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

And third, in finding a reliable means of reproducing in the laboratory the black student underperformance we'd seen in real life, we knew we could examine it up close—tear it apart and see how it worked.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Joshua Aronson
Page Number: 52
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Here was the irony we had suspected. What made Mikel's vanguard black students susceptible to stereotype pressure was not weaker academic confidence and skills but stronger academic confidence and skills.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Mikel Jollet
Page Number: 58
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 4 Quotes

Maalouf's emphasis is similar to mine: of all the things that make an identity prominent in one's feeling and thinking, being threatened on the basis of it is perhaps the most important.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Amin Maalouf
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

If you want to change the behaviors and outcomes associated with social identity—say, too few women in computer science—don't focus on changing the internal manifestations of the identity, such as values, and attitudes. Focus instead on changing the contingencies to which all of that internal stuff is an adaptation.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 5 Quotes

The stereotype threat created by this comment impaired the math performance of exceptionally strong white male math students. No special self-doubting susceptibility seemed necessary.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 92
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 7 Quotes

[Treisman] saw black students—in an effort to succeed where their abilities are negatively stereotyped—following a strategy of intense, isolated effort, a strategy that often set them up for defeats and discouragements.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Philip Uri Treisman
Page Number: 103
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Our ability to grasp our emotions, then, is not perfect. When they are very strong, it is easier to know them directly. But when they are moderate, like the lingering anxiety one would feel after crossing the Capilano Bridge, we have less direct access to them. To know and interpret our more moderate emotions, we rely more on what's going on in the immediate situation.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 116
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

The harder the psychology majors (at risk of confirming the stereotype) thought, the more stable their heartbeat interval, the worse they did. Hard thinking for the science majors, under little stereotype pressure, reflected constructive engagement with the test. Hard thinking for the psychology majors, at risk of confirming the stereotype, reflected performance-worsening rumination.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 123
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

John Henryism sounds like the attitude of people who show stereotype threat effects—people who are identified with, and care a lot about succeeding in, an area where their group is negatively stereotyped.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Related Symbols: John Henry
Page Number: 130
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 8 Quotes

The term "critical mass" refers to the point at which there are enough minorities in a setting, like a school or a workplace, that individual minorities no longer feel uncomfortable there because they are minorities—in our terms, they no longer feel an interfering level of identity threat. When Justice O'Connor was alone on the Court, she lacked critical mass.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Justice Sandra Day O’Connor
Page Number: 135
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Herein may lie a principle of remedy: if enough cues in a setting can lead members of a group to feel "identity safe," it might neutralize the impact of other cues in the setting that could otherwise threaten them.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 147
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 9 Quotes

Why was it so effective? It resolved their interpretative quandary. It told them they weren't being seen in terms of the bad stereotype about their group's intellectual abilities, since the feedback giver used high intellectual standards and believed they could meet them. They could feel less jeopardy. The motivation they had always had was released.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Black students who got a brief narrative intervention of the sort I just described averaged one-third of a letter grade higher in the next semester than black students in a control group who got the results of a survey about political attitudes rather than about college life.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 166
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

Heart attacks also have background causes that are difficult to change—genetic history, long-term habits of diet and exercise, smoking, life stress, etc. Nevertheless, the likelihood of a heart attack can be greatly reduced by drugs and surgery. They do nothing to counter the background causes of heart disease; they treat the most immediate cause of a heart attack, blocked coronary arties.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 182
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 10 Quotes

The identity threat explanation doesn't require attributing prejudice to the white passengers. All one need assume, it says, is that they have a worry like Ted's: the risk of saying, doing, or even thinking something that would make them feel racist or like they could be seen as racist in interacting with the black passenger. It takes the perspective of the person whose actions one is trying to explain—the woman or minority taking the math test, for example, or in this case the perspective of the white passengers passing up the seat next to a black passenger. It assumes, in light of present-day norms of civility, that most of these passengers are invested in not appearing as racist. It further assumes that this investment, ironically, may lead them to avoid situations like the seat next to the black passenger.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Sheryll Cashin, Ted McDougal
Page Number: 192
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

This was Glenn Loury’s reasoning. It led him to a surprising claim: the everyday associational preferences that contribute to racially organized networks and locations in American life—that is, racially organized residential patterns, schooling, friendship networks, and so on—may now be more important causes of racial inequality than direct discrimination against blacks. He's not announcing the end of racial discrimination. He's simply underlining the importance of preferences that organize blacks out of networks and locations that could better their outcomes.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Glenn Loury
Page Number: 198
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

The prospect of an interracial conversation on a racially sensitive topic made white participants mindful of the whites-as-racist stereotype. And the more mindful they were of this stereotype, the more they distanced themselves from black conversation partners. Worry about being stereotyped was driving them away.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker)
Page Number: 203
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

It wasn't prejudice that caused them to sit farther from their black partners conversation. It was fear of being seen as racist—pure and simple. It was stereotype threat, a contingency of their white identities in that situation. It was probably this threat, too, rather than racial prejudice, that caused Ted's intense discomfort in his African American political science class, and that caused at least some of the white passengers to give Sheryll Cashin her Southwest Airlines First Class seat and that might make it difficult for white teachers to engage poor-performing minority students. Who needs the hassle?

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Sheryll Cashin, Ted McDougal
Page Number: 205
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 11 Quotes

When I look over my life as an African American, I see improvements in the contingencies attached to that identity. The swimming pool restrictions of my youth are gone. So are the suffocating limitations Anatole Broyard would have faced as a black man in New York City in the late 1940s. Things have gotten better. But remember, contingencies grow out of an identity's role in the history and organization of a society—its role in the DNA of a society—and how society has stereotyped that identity.

Related Characters: Claude Steele (speaker), Anatole Broyard
Related Symbols: The Swimming Pool
Page Number: 212
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
No matches.