Winesburg, Ohio

Winesburg, Ohio

by

Sherwood Anderson

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Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet edition of Winesburg, Ohio published in 1993.
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1. The Book of the Grotesque Quotes

It was the truths that made the people grotesques. The old man had quite an elaborate theory concerning the matter. It was his notion that the moment one of the people took one of the truths to himself, called it his truth, and tried to live his life by it, he became a grotesque and the truth he embraced became a falsehood.

Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:
2. Hands Quotes

In Winesburg the hands had attracted attention merely because of their activity. With them Wing Biddlebaum had picked as high as a hundred and forty quarts of strawberries in a day. They became his distinguishing feature, the source of his fame. And they made more grotesque an already grotesque and elusive individuality.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Wing Biddlebaum / Adolph Meyers
Related Symbols: Hands
Page Number: 8
Explanation and Analysis:

“You must try to forget all you have learned,” said the old man. “You must begin to dream. From this time on you must shut your ears to the roaring of the voices.”

Related Characters: Wing Biddlebaum / Adolph Meyers (speaker), George Willard
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:

In the dense blotch of light beneath the table, the kneeling figure looked like a priest engaged in some service of his church. The nervous expressive fingers, flashing in and out of the light, might well have been mistaken for the fingers of the devotee going swiftly through decade after decade of his rosary.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Wing Biddlebaum / Adolph Meyers
Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:
3. Paper Pills Quotes

Little pyramids of truth he erected and after erecting knocked them down again that he might have the truths to erect other pyramids.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Doctor Reefy
Page Number: 15
Explanation and Analysis:

On the trees are only a few gnarled apples that the pickers have rejected. They look like the knuckles of Doctor Reefy’s hands…Only the few know the sweetness of the twisted apples.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Elizabeth Willard, Doctor Reefy
Related Symbols: Hands
Page Number: 17-18
Explanation and Analysis:
4. Mother Quotes

The hotel was continually losing patronage because of its shabbiness and she thought of herself as also shabby. Her own room was in an obscure corner and when she felt able to work she voluntarily worked among the beds, preferring the labor that could be done when the guests were abroad seeking trade among the merchants of Winesburg.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), George Willard, Elizabeth Willard, Tom Willard
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:

George Willard had a habit of talking aloud to himself and to hear him doing so had always given his mother a peculiar pleasure. The habit in him, she felt, strengthened the secret bond that existed between them. A thousand times she had whispered to herself of the matter. “He is groping about, trying to find himself,” she thought. “He is not a dull clod, all words and smartness. Within him there is a secret something that is striving to grow. It is the thing I let be killed in myself.”

Related Characters: Elizabeth Willard (speaker), The Narrator (speaker), George Willard
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:
5. The Philosopher Quotes

“If something happens perhaps you will be able to write the book that I may never get written. The idea is very simple, so simple that if you are not careful you will forget it. It is this—that everyone in the world is Christ and they are all crucified. That’s what I want to say. Don’t you forget that. Whatever happens, don’t you dare let yourself forget.”

Related Characters: Doctor Parcival (speaker), George Willard
Page Number: 38
Explanation and Analysis:
7. Godliness, Part I Quotes

As time passed and he grew to know people better, he began to think of himself as an extraordinary man, one set apart from his fellows. He wanted terribly to make his life a thing of great importance, and as he looked about at his fellow men and saw how like clod they lived it seemed to him that he could not bear to become also such a clod.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Jesse Bentley
Page Number: 50
Explanation and Analysis:

In our day a farmer standing by the stove in the store in his village has his mind filled to overflowing with the words of other men. The newspapers and the magazines have pumped him full. Much of the old brutal ignorance that had in it also a kind of beautiful childlike ignorance is gone forever. The farmer by the stove is brother to the men of the cities, and if you listen you will find him talking as glibly and as senselessly as the best city man of us all.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Jesse Bentley
Page Number: 52
Explanation and Analysis:
8. Godliness, Part II Quotes

The beginning of the most materialistic age in the history of the world…when men would forget God and only pay attention to moral standards, when the will to power would replace the will to serve and beauty would well-nigh forgotten in the terrible headlong rush of mankind toward the acquiring of possessions, was telling its story to Jesse the man of God as it was to the men about him.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Jesse Bentley
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:
9. Godliness, Part III: Surrender Quotes

It seemed to her that between herself and all the other people in the world, a wall had been built up and that she was living just on the edge of some warm inner circle of life that must be quite open and understandable to others. She became obsessed with the thought that it wanted but a courageous act on her part to make all of her association with people something quite different, and that it was possible by such an act to pass into a new life as one opens a door and goes into a room.

Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:
11. A Man of Ideas Quotes

“Let’s take decay. Now what is decay? It’s fire. It burns up wood and other things…This sidewalk here and this feed store, the trees down the street there—they’re all on fire. They’re burning up. Decay you see is always going on…The world is on fire. Start your pieces in the paper that way. Just say in big letters ‘The World is On Fire.’ That will make ‘em look up.”

Related Characters: Joe Welling (speaker), George Willard, Doctor Parcival, Wash Williams
Page Number: 90-91
Explanation and Analysis:
12. Adventure Quotes

“What is the matter with me? I will do something dreadful if I am not careful,” she thought, and turning her face to the wall, began trying to force herself to face bravely the fact that many people must live and die alone, even in Winesburg.

Related Characters: Alice Hindman (speaker), The Narrator (speaker), Ned Currie
Page Number: 105
Explanation and Analysis:
15. Tandy Quotes

The stranger arose and stood before Tom Hard. His body rocked back and forth and he seemed about to fall, but instead he dropped to his knees on the sidewalk and raise the hands of the little girl to his drunken lips. He kissed them ecstatically. “Be Tandy, little one,” he pleaded. “Dare to be strong and courageous. That is the road. Venture anything. Be brave enough to dare to be loved. Be something more than man or woman. Be Tandy.”

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), The Stranger (speaker), Tandy Hard, Tom Hard
Related Symbols: Hands
Page Number: 132-133
Explanation and Analysis:
17. The Teacher Quotes

“If you are to become a writer you’ll have to stop fooling with words,” she explained. “It would be better to give up the notion of writing until you are better prepared. Now it’s time to be living. I don’t want to frighten you, but I would like to make you understand the import of what you think of attempting. You must not become a mere peddler of words. The thing to learn is to know what people are thinking about, not what they say.”

Related Characters: Kate Swift (speaker), George Willard
Page Number: 150
Explanation and Analysis:
18. Loneliness Quotes

His room began to be inhabited by the spirits of men and women among whom he went, in turn saying words. It was as though everyone Enoch Robinson had ever seen had left with him some essence of himself, something he could mould and change to suit his own fancy, something that understood all about such things as the wounded woman behind the elders in the pictures.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), George Willard, Enoch Robinson
Page Number: 157-158
Explanation and Analysis:
19. An Awakening Quotes

“There is a law for armies and for men too,” he muttered, lost in reflection. “The law begins with little things and spreads out until it covers everything. In every little thing there must be order…I must myself be orderly. I must learn that law. I must get myself into touch with something orderly and big that swings through the night like a star. In my little way I must begin to learn something, to give and swing and work with life, with the law.”

Related Characters: George Willard (speaker), Kate Swift
Page Number: 170-171
Explanation and Analysis:
23. Death Quotes

“I had come to the time in my life when prayer became necessary and so I invented gods and prayed to them…Then I found that this woman Elizabeth knew, that she worshipped also the same gods. I have a notion that she came to the office because she thought the gods would be there but she was happy to find herself not alone just the same.”

Related Characters: Doctor Reefy (speaker), Elizabeth Willard
Page Number: Page 211
Explanation and Analysis:

“Love is like a wind stirring the grass beneath trees on a black night,” he had said. “You must not try to make love definite. It is the divine accident of life. If you try to be definite and sure about it and to live beneath the trees, where soft night winds blow, the long hot day of disappointment comes swiftly and the gritty dust from passing wagons gathers upon lips inflamed and made tender by kisses.”

Related Characters: Doctor Reefy (speaker), Elizabeth Willard, Tom Willard
Page Number: Page 211
Explanation and Analysis:
24. Sophistication Quotes

The eighteen years he has lived seem but a moment, a breathing space in the long march of humanity. Already he hears death calling. With all his heart he wants to come close to some other human, touch someone with his hands, be touched by the hand of another. If he prefers that the other be a woman, that is because he believes a woman will be gentle, that she will understand. He wants, most of all, understanding.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), George Willard, Elizabeth Willard, Helen White
Page Number: 224
Explanation and Analysis:

There is something memorable in the experience to be had by going to a fair ground that stands at the edge of a Middle Western town on a night after the annual fair has been held. The sensation is one never to be forgotten. On all side are ghosts, not of the dead, but of living people…One shudders at the thought of the meaninglessness of life while at the same instant, and if the people of the town are his people, one loves life so intensely that tears come into the eyes.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), George Willard
Page Number: 229-230
Explanation and Analysis:

He began to think of the people in the town where he had always lived with something like reverence. He had reverence for Helen. He wanted to love and be loved by her, but he did not want at the moment to be confused by her womanhood…In that high place in the darkness the two oddly sensitive human atoms held each other tightly and waited. In the mind of each was the same though. “I have come to this lonely place and here is the other,” was the substance of the thing felt.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), George Willard, Helen White
Page Number: 230-231
Explanation and Analysis:
25. Departure Quotes

The young man’s mind was carried away by his growing passion for dreams. One looking at him would not have thought him particularly sharp. With the recollection of little things occupying his mind he closed his eyes and leaned back in the car seat. He stayed that way for a long time and when he aroused himself and again looked out of the car window the town of Winesburg had disappeared and his life there had become but a background on which to paint the dreams of his manhood.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), George Willard, Helen White
Page Number: 236
Explanation and Analysis:
No matches.