Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories

Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories

by

Sandra Cisneros

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A character in “Tin Tan Tan” and “Bien Pretty,” an American woman of Mexican heritage who moves from Northern California to Texas to work as an art director. Lupita is interested in New Age spirituality and wants badly to be seen as Mexican. Unfortunately, her Mexican identity seems to pale in comparison to her boyfriend Flavio’s, a fact that enrages her while perhaps also drawing her to him all the more. When Flavio turns out to be insensitive and callous, Lupita spends hours at a time watching telenovelas as a way of escaping from the world. It isn’t until after a conversation with a cashier at a Mexican supermarket—in which the cashier calls her shawl pretty—that she’s able to accept her heartache and start to move on with her life.

Lupita Quotes in Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories

The Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories quotes below are all either spoken by Lupita or refer to Lupita. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage Books edition of Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories published in 1991.
Bien Pretty Quotes

“Who dresses you?”
“Silver.”
“What’s that? A store or a horse?”
“Neither. Silver Galindo. My San Antonio cousin.”
“What kind of name is Silver?”
“It’s English,” Flavio said, “for Silvestre.”

I said, “What you are, sweetheart, is a product of American imperialism,” and plucked at the alligator on his shirt.
“I don’t have to dress in a sarape and sombrero to be Mexican,” Flavio said. “I know who I am.”
I wanted to leap across the table, throw the Oaxacan black pottery pieces across the room, swing from the punched tin chandelier, fire a pistol at his Reeboks, and force him to dance. I wanted to be Mexican at that moment, but it was true. I was not Mexican. Instead of the volley of insults I intended, all I managed to sling was a single clay pebble that dissolved on impact—perro. “dog.” It wasn’t even the word I’d meant to hurl.

Page Number: 151
Explanation and Analysis:

And in my dreams I’m slapping the heroine to her senses, because I want them to be women who make things happen, not women who things happen to. Not loves that are tormentosos. Not men powerful and passionate versus women either volatile and evil, or sweet and resigned. But women. Real women. The ones I’ve loved all my life. If you don’t like it lárgate, honey. Those women. The ones I’ve known everywhere except on TV, in books and magazines. Las girlfriends. Las comadres. Our mamas and tías. Passionate and powerful, tender and volatile, brave. And, above all, fierce.

Page Number: 161
Explanation and Analysis:
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Lupita Character Timeline in Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories

The timeline below shows where the character Lupita appears in Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Tin Tan Tan
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
A poet named Rogelio Velasco professes his love to a woman named Lupita, whose name he spells out using the first letter of every paragraph (or stanza) in... (full context)
Bien Pretty
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Lupita opens her story by saying that Flavio Munguía isn’t pretty unless you’re in love with... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
Lupita’s friend Beatriz Soliz was beside herself upon learning that Lupita was moving to Texas. “Lupe,... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
After Lupita decides that Flavio absolutely must pose for her painting, she asks, “Would you like to... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
Every Sunday morning, Lupita visits the Laundromat. While her clothes tumble through the machines, she eats lunch across the... (full context)
Female Objectification & Power Theme Icon
Lupita explains that Flavio comes from a poor family in Mexico, a family whose only hope... (full context)
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
Flavio and Lupita meet at her house every other Sunday so she can paint him. During these sessions,... (full context)
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
Flavio comes to Lupita’s for dinner one night, and the two talk about music. Flavio reveals that he likes... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
Loss, Longing, & Grief Theme Icon
When Lupita finally makes love to Flavio, she learns that, in addition to the tattoo on his... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Female Objectification & Power Theme Icon
One Sunday morning at Taco Haven, Flavio calmly announces to Lupita, “My life, I have to go.” He explains that his mother has written to him... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
Loss, Longing, & Grief Theme Icon
After breaking up with Flavio, Lupita desperately searches out her healing crystals at home and puts on tapes of “Amazon flutes,... (full context)
Female Objectification & Power Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
In Centenao’s Mexican Supermarket one day, a cashier says to Lupita, “Bien pretty, your shawl. You didn’t buy it in San Antonio?” Lupita tells her it’s... (full context)
Love, The Joy of Life, & Interconnection Theme Icon
Female Objectification & Power Theme Icon
Cultural & National Identity Theme Icon
In the coming days, Lupita returns to her painting of Flavio, in which he is an Aztecan prince crouching over... (full context)