Yellow Woman

by

Leslie Marmon Silko

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The Narrator’s Grandfather Character Analysis

Although the narrator’s grandfather is deceased at the time of the narration, he occupies an important space in the text and in her mind. The narrator thinks about how her grandfather loved to tell Yellow Woman stories. Her memory of the stories seems to function like a prophecy, and because her grandfather was the source of this information, he remains a powerful force in her life despite his absence. At the end of the text, when she returns home, the narrator wishes her grandfather were around to hear her story—a Yellow Woman story—because he would have understood in a way that the rest of her family would not.

The Narrator’s Grandfather Quotes in Yellow Woman

The Yellow Woman quotes below are all either spoken by The Narrator’s Grandfather or refer to The Narrator’s Grandfather. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Identity Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of Yellow Woman published in 2012.
Part Four Quotes

I decided to tell them that some Navajo had kidnapped me, but I was sorry that old Grandpa wasn’t alive to hear my story because it was the Yellow Woman stories he liked to tell best.

Related Characters: Yellow Woman/Narrator (speaker), The Narrator’s Grandfather
Page Number: 60
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Yellow Woman LitChart as a printable PDF.
Yellow Woman PDF

The Narrator’s Grandfather Character Timeline in Yellow Woman

The timeline below shows where the character The Narrator’s Grandfather appears in Yellow Woman. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part One
Identity Theme Icon
Reality and Myth Theme Icon
Time, Storytelling, Prophecy Theme Icon
Native American Culture, Identity, and Experience Theme Icon
...Yellow Woman from the old stories. The narrator then gets lost in thought, remembering her grandfather telling Yellow Woman stories, particularly one about characters called Badger and Coyote. She thinks about... (full context)
Part Two
Reality and Myth Theme Icon
Native American Culture, Identity, and Experience Theme Icon
The narrator wonders how her family has reacted to her disappearance and knows her deceased grandfather would have understood that a ka’tsina had taken her into the mountain. She thinks about... (full context)
Part Four
Identity Theme Icon
Reality and Myth Theme Icon
Time, Storytelling, Prophecy Theme Icon
Native American Culture, Identity, and Experience Theme Icon
...decides to tell her family that a Navajo kidnapped her, but she wishes that her grandfather was around to hear her story, a Yellow Woman story. (full context)