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The Farmer's Bride Summary & Analysis
by Charlotte Mew

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“The Farmer’s Bride” (1912) is a dramatic monologue by the English poet Charlotte Mew, and eventually became the title work of her acclaimed 1916 collection. The poem's speaker, a farmer, reflects on his marriage to a much younger girl, who is clearly afraid of him and uncomfortable with the traditional role she is expected to play as a wife. While he's sympathetic to her fear, he's also unable to really understand her—and the poem's ominous conclusion suggests that he's not going to be gentle with her for too much longer.

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