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The Trees are Down Summary & Analysis
by Charlotte Mew

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Charlotte Mew wrote “The Trees are Down” in the 1920s after watching workers saw down plane trees in London’s Euston Square Gardens. The poem’s speaker poignantly narrates the trees’ slow death while positioning them within a wider network of living things. This free verse poem has a distinctive structure characterized by long, sprawling lines that resemble roots and branches. Environmental concerns are a common thread throughout Mew’s body of poetic work, which often examines the complexities of humankind’s relationship with nature. "The Trees are Down" appears in The Rambling Sailor, Mew’s posthumous collection of poetry, which was published in 1929.

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