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Pity me not (Sonnet 29) Summary & Analysis
by Edna St. Vincent Millay

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Edna St. Vincent Millay's "Pity me not" is a sonnet of lost love. In this short, sad poem, a speaker tries to reconcile herself to the fact that love, like everything else in the world, inevitably fades away. The speaker tells her one-time lover not to pity her based on the fact that his love has (quite naturally) waned: pity her, the speaker says, because, even though she can understand that love doesn't last forever, her heart's still in terrible pain. The speaker here goes through an old human battle, suffering through the conflict between her quick mind and her unreasoning heart. The poem was published in 1923 as part of a sonnet sequence Millay began in 1920.

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