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The Sky is low Summary & Analysis
by Emily Dickinson

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In this short poem, a speaker gazes gloomily at a chilly, gray winter's day, which looks just about as dismal as the speaker seems to feel. That's not so unusual, the speaker reflects, with a touch of tongue-in-cheek wit: both people and nature have their lousy moods as well as their good ones. Like most of Emily Dickinson's poetry, "The Sky is low — the Clouds are mean" was never published during Dickinson's lifetime; it first appeared in a posthumous collection, Poems (1890).

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