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The Eve of St. Agnes Summary & Analysis
by John Keats

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"The Eve of St. Agnes"—first published in Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems (1820)—is Romantic poet John Keats's tale of passion, legends, danger, and dreams. In this narrative poem, Porphyro, a young nobleman, creeps into the castle of his enemies to catch a glimpse of his love, the beautiful Madeline. Madeline happens to be performing a magical ritual that very night, calling on St. Agnes to send her a dream of her future husband. Porphyro decides he'll do her one better, and creeps into her bedroom to make her dream a reality. This poem explores both the power of sexual passion and the dangerous allure of fantasy.

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