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The Trees Summary & Analysis
by Philip Larkin

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The British poet Philip Larkin included "The Trees" in his book High Windows, which was published in 1974. The speaker sees spring's budding trees as "a kind of grief." The speaker says that this isn't borne from envy about the fact that the leaves are born anew each year while human beings get old; the trees themselves age, too, the speaker points out, even if their leaves re-bloom each year. Still, the fresh growth of spring reminds the speaker to cast of the past and live in the present—even in the face of inevitable mortality.

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