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The Sound of the Trees Summary & Analysis
by Robert Frost

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"The Sound of the Trees" is poem by Robert Frost that first appeared in his third collection, Mountain Interval (1916). The poem explores the tension between longing and action, illustrated by the image of trees swaying in the wind even as they remain firmly planted in the ground. The speaker takes offense to the sound of the trees' rustling leaves, describing this "noise" as the trees' hypocritical chatter about getting away despite knowing full well that they're going to stay put. Through these personified trees, the poem explores the conflict between people's desire to set off and make new lives for themselves and their inability (or refusal) to actually leave their familiar worlds behind.

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