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The Tuft of Flowers Summary & Analysis
by Robert Frost

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"The Tuft of Flowers" appeared in American poet Robert Frost's first collection, A Boy's Will, in 1913. While many of the poems in this highly autobiographical collection describe a desire to remain somewhat separate from society, "The Tuft of Flowers" expresses a deep longing to connect with other people. The poem's speaker is a lonely field hand who stumbles upon a patch of flowers that his fellow worker, a "mower," has left untouched. The speaker feels a sense of kinship and camaraderie with his unseen coworker in this moment that cuts through his isolation. In this way, the poem explores how a shared appreciation for nature can bring people together, even if only in spirit.

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