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They Flee From Me Summary & Analysis
by Sir Thomas Wyatt

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"They Flee From Me" is a poem by the 16th-century English poet and courtier Thomas Wyatt. In the poem, the speaker laments the fact that he has fallen from favor—the women who used to "seek" him in his "chamber" now seem to "flee" from him. The poem is often associated with Wyatt's own biography—he is famously rumored to have had an affair with Anne Boleyn, one of Henry VIII's wives—but the poem more generally captures the sense of confusion, regret, and bitterness that can come with the end of a relationship. It also provides a great insight into the world of intrigue, suspicion, and changing fortunes that was the Tudor court (the Tudor dynasty ruled over England for three centuries).

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