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The Clod and the Pebble Summary & Analysis
by William Blake

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"The Clod and the Pebble" is a poem by William Blake, first published in Songs of Innocence and Experience (1794). In the poem, a personified clod (a small clump of earth or clay) and pebble put forward two very different definitions of love. The clod, representing the more optimistic—and perhaps naive—perspective, views love as a kind of radical selflessness, in which giving and self-sacrifice are all-important. The pebble disagrees, declaring instead that love is in fact pure selfishness, something that only seeks to please itself. In the end, the poem leaves it up to the reader to make up their own mind about the true nature of love.

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