A line-by-line translation

All's Well That Ends Well

All's Well That Ends Well Translation Act 3, Scene 3

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Flourish. Enter the DUKE of Florence, BERTRAM, PAROLLES, Soldiers, Drum, and Trumpets

DUKE

The general of our horse thou art; and we,Great in our hope, lay our best love and credenceUpon thy promising fortune.

DUKE

You're now commander of the cavalry. We're putting all our hope, love, and belief in your great potential. 

BERTRAM

Sir, it is A charge too heavy for my strength, but yet We'll strive to bear it for your worthy sake To the extreme edge of hazard.

BERTRAM

Sir, that's too weighty an honor for my little worth, but still I'll try to bear it for your sake, even to the death. 

DUKE

Then go thou forth;And fortune play upon thy prosperous helm,As thy auspicious mistress!

DUKE

Then go forth, Bertram. May good fortune be on your side, following your helmet, like a devoted mistress! 

BERTRAM

This very day, Great Mars, I put myself into thy file: Make me but like my thoughts, and I shall prove A lover of thy drum, hater of love.

BERTRAM

This very day, great Mars, god of war, I declare myself one of your soldiers. Make me as warlike as my thoughts, and I'll prove to be a lover of the drums of battle and a hater of gentle love. 

Exeunt

All s well that ends well
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Dan rubins
About the Translator: Dan Rubins

Dan Rubins is currently completing his MA in Shakespeare Studies from King's College London/Shakespeare's Globe and will be pursuing an MA in Elementary Inclusive Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds a BA in English from Yale University. His Masters dissertation focuses on announcements of death in early modern drama, and other research areas of interest include Shakespeare in transformative contexts (prisons, schools, etc.) and rhyme in Shakespeare's dramatic texts. In addition to teaching and learning, he also writes theatre reviews (often of Shakespeare productions), composes musical theatre (frequently with Shakespearean inspirations), and sings in choirs (occasionally in Shakespearean choral settings).