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All's Well That Ends Well

All's Well That Ends Well Translation Act 5, Scene 1

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Enter HELENA, Widow, and DIANA, with two Attendants

HELENA

But this exceeding posting day and night Must wear your spirits low; we cannot help it: But since you have made the days and nights as one, To wear your gentle limbs in my affairs, Be bold you do so grow in my requital As nothing can unroot you. In happy time;

HELENA

But walking constantly day and night must be tiring you out. We can't help it. Since we've been treating the days and nights like they're all the same, and you've been wearing out your gentle bodies just for my sake, rest assured that I am more and more in your debt and nothing will ever undo that. Oh, good timing! 

Enter a Gentleman

HELENA

This man may help me to his majesty's ear,If he would spend his power. God save you, sir.

HELENA

This man might help me to reach the king if he's willing to lend a hand. God bless you, sir. 

GENTLEMAN

And you.

GENTLEMAN

And you. 

HELENA

Sir, I have seen you in the court of France.

HELENA

Sir, I have seen you at the French court. 

GENTLEMAN

I have been sometimes there.

GENTLEMAN

I have been there sometimes. 

HELENA

I do presume, sir, that you are not fallen From the report that goes upon your goodness; An therefore, goaded with most sharp occasions, Which lay nice manners by, I put you to The use of your own virtues, for the which I shall continue thankful.

HELENA

I assume, sir, that you're still maintaining your good reputation. If that's true, since I'm in a difficult situation that forces me to forget my manners, I'll ask you to act in your typical virtuous way, for which I'd be forever grateful. 

GENTLEMAN

What's your will?

GENTLEMAN

How can I help?

HELENA

That it will please you To give this poor petition to the king, And aid me with that store of power you have To come into his presence.

HELENA

If you could please give this little letter to the king, and help me with whatever power you have to visit him in person. 

GENTLEMAN

The king's not here.

GENTLEMAN

The king's not here. 

HELENA

Not here, sir!

HELENA

Not here, sir?

GENTLEMAN

Not, indeed:He hence removed last night and with more hasteThan is his use.

GENTLEMAN

Indeed not. He just left last night and more quickly than he usually does. 

WIDOW

Lord, how we lose our pains!

WIDOW

Lord, we've been exhausting ourselves for nothing! 

HELENA

All's well that ends well yet,Though time seem so adverse and means unfit.I do beseech you, whither is he gone?

HELENA

All's well that ends well still, even though our timing and methods seem to fail us. 

[To the Gentleman] I beg you, where's the king gone?

GENTLEMAN

Marry, as I take it, to Rousillon;Whither I am going.

GENTLEMAN

Well, as far as I know, to Roussillon. I'm going there too. 

HELENA

I do beseech you, sir, Since you are like to see the king before me, Commend the paper to his gracious hand, Which I presume shall render you no blame But rather make you thank your pains for it. I will come after you with what good speed Our means will make us means.

HELENA

I beg you, sir, since you'll probably see the king before I do, bring this paper to his kind hand. I'm pretty sure that doing so won't get you in trouble but will make you glad you did it. I'll come after you as fast as we're able. 

GENTLEMAN

This I'll do for you.

GENTLEMAN

I'll do this for you. 

HELENA

And you shall find yourself to be well thank'd,Whate'er falls more. We must to horse again.Go, go, provide.

HELENA

And you'll find yourself to be well thanked, whatever else happens. We must ride our horses again.

[To the Attendant] Go, go, get the horses. 

Exeunt

All s well that ends well
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Dan rubins
About the Translator: Dan Rubins

Dan Rubins is currently completing his MA in Shakespeare Studies from King's College London/Shakespeare's Globe and will be pursuing an MA in Elementary Inclusive Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds a BA in English from Yale University. His Masters dissertation focuses on announcements of death in early modern drama, and other research areas of interest include Shakespeare in transformative contexts (prisons, schools, etc.) and rhyme in Shakespeare's dramatic texts. In addition to teaching and learning, he also writes theatre reviews (often of Shakespeare productions), composes musical theatre (frequently with Shakespearean inspirations), and sings in choirs (occasionally in Shakespearean choral settings).