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Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra Translation Act 3, Scene 5

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Enter ENOBARBUS and EROS

ENOBARBUS

How now, friend Eros!

ENOBARBUS

How are you doing, my friend Eros!

EROS

There’s strange news come, sir.

EROS

There's been some strange news, sir.

ENOBARBUS

What, man?

ENOBARBUS

What, man?

EROS

Caesar and Lepidus have made wars upon Pompey.

EROS

Caesar and Lepidus have declared war against Pompey.

ENOBARBUS

This is old. What is the success?

ENOBARBUS

That's old news. How is the fight going?

EROS

Caesar, having made use of him in the wars ’gainst Pompey, presently denied him rivality, would not let himpartake in the glory of the action, and, not resting here, accuses him of letters he had formerly wrote to Pompey; upon his own appeal seizes him. So the poor third is up, till death enlarge his confine.

EROS

Caesar used Lepidus to help him fight Pompey, but then immediately denied Lepidus equal power, wouldn't share the glory of the victory with him, and what's more, he's making accusations against him based on letters Lepidus had written to Pompey. Upon Caesar's accusations, Lepidus was arrested. So this poor third is imprisoned until he is freed by death.

ENOBARBUS

Then, world, thou hast a pair of chaps, no more,And throw between them all the food thou hast,They’ll grind the one the other. Where’s Antony?

ENOBARBUS

Then, world, you have a pair of leaders, no more, and even if you offer them all the wealth you have, one will still destroy the other. Where's Antony?

EROS

He’s walking in the garden— (imitating anger) thus, and spurns The rush that lies before him; cries, “Fool Lepidus!” And threats the throat of that his officer That murdered Pompey.

EROS

He's walking in the garden—[Imitating anger] like this. He kicks the plants that lie in his path, cries, "Fool Lepidus!" and threatens to slit the throat of that officer of his that murdered Pompey.

ENOBARBUS

Our great navy’s rigged.

ENOBARBUS

Our great navy is ready.

EROS

For Italy and Caesar. More, Domitius:My lord desires you presently. My newsI might have told hereafter.

EROS

To go to Italy and face Caesar. There's more, Domitus: my lord wants to see you immediately. I should have told you my news afterwards. 

ENOBARBUS

’Twill be naught,But let it be. Bring me to Antony.

ENOBARBUS

It doesn't matter, never mind. Bring me to Antony.

EROS

Come, sir.

EROS

Come, sir.

Exeunt

Antony and cleopatra
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Maria devlin
About the Translator: Maria Devlin

Maria Devlin received her Ph.D. in English Literature from Harvard University, where she specialized in Renaissance drama. She has worked as a bibliographical and editorial assistant for The Norton Anthology of English Literature and for The Norton Shakespeare. She is currently working with Stephen Greenblatt to design online courses on Shakespeare, including the modules "Hamlet's Ghost" and "Shylock's Bond" offered through HarvardX. She is writing a book on Renaissance comedy.

Maria Devlin wishes to credit the following sources, which she consulted extensively in composing her translations and annotations:

William Shakespeare. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition. Eds. Gary Taylor et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

William Shakespeare. The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd ed. Eds. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: W.W. Norton& Company, Inc., 2016.