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Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra Translation Act 4, Scene 9

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Enter a SENTRY and his company. ENOBARBUS follows

SENTRY

If we be not relieved within this hour, We must return to th’ court of guard. The night Is shiny, and they say we shall embattle By th’ second hour i’ th’ morn.

SENTRY

If the other guards don't come to replace us within the next hour, we'll have to return to the guardroom. There's bright light tonight, and they say we'll resume battle by two in the morning.

FIRST WATCH

This last day was a shrewd one to ’s.

FIRST WATCH

This last day was a bad one for us. 

ENOBARBUS

O bear me witness, night—

ENOBARBUS

Oh night, bear witness to my words—

SECOND WATCH

What man is this?

SECOND WATCH

Who is this?

FIRST WATCH

Stand close and list him.

FIRST WATCH

Let's hide and listen to him.

ENOBARBUS

Be witness to me, O thou blessèd moon, When men revolted shall upon record Bear hateful memory, poor Enobarbus did Before thy face repent.

ENOBARBUS

Bear witness to me, oh you blessed moon: when the time comes that rebels are remembered with hatred, remember that poor Enobarbus repented before you for rebelling. 

SENTRY

Enobarbus?

SENTRY

Enobarbus?

SECOND WATCH

Peace! Hark further.

SECOND WATCH

Be quiet! Keep listening.

ENOBARBUS

O sovereign mistress of true melancholy, The poisonous damp of night disponge upon me, That life, a very rebel to my will, May hang no longer on me. Throw my heart Against the flint and hardness of my fault, Which, being dried with grief, will break to powder And finish all foul thoughts. O Antony, Nobler than my revolt is infamous, Forgive me in thine own particular, But let the world rank me in register A master-leaver and a fugitive. O Antony! O Antony!

ENOBARBUS

Oh moon, you royal mistress of genuine melancholy, pour down the poisonous mists of night upon me, so that I may no longer live, now that I no longer wish to. Take my heart and throw it against my hard sin. which is weak from grief. It will burst into pieces and all my bitter thoughts will end with my death. Oh Antony, your nobility is even greater than my fault is terrible. I wish that you would forgive me for those sins that I've committed against you, but I want the rest of the world to remember me as a deserter and someone who abandoned his master. Oh Antony! Oh Antony! 

He dies

FIRST WATCH

Let’s speak to him.

FIRST WATCH

Let's speak to him. 

SENTRY

Let’s hear him, for the things he speaks may concern Caesar.

SENTRY

Let's listen to him, because the things he's talking about might have to do with Caesar. 

SECOND WATCH

Let’s do so. But he sleeps.

SECOND WATCH

Let's do that. But he's asleep. 

SENTRY

Swoons rather, for so bad a prayer as hisWas never yet for sleep.

SENTRY

I think he's fainted, actually. No one ever said such a despairing prayer to lull themselves to sleep. 

FIRST WATCH

Go we to him.

FIRST WATCH

Let's go to him. 

SECOND WATCH

Awake, sir, awake. Speak to us.

SECOND WATCH

Wake up, sir, wake up. Speak to us. 

FIRST WATCH

Hear you, sir?

FIRST WATCH

Can you hear us, sir?

SENTRY

The hand of death hath raught him.

SENTRY

Death has struck him down.

Drums afar off

Hark, the drums Demurely wake the sleepers. Let us bear him To th’ court of guard. He is of note. Our hour Is fully out.

Listen, the drums are waking up the sleeping men with their subdued noise. Let's carry him to the guardroom. He's a person of high rank. The time of our watch is up. 

SECOND WATCH

Come on, then. He may recover yet.

SECOND WATCH

Come on, then. He might still wake up. 

Exeunt with the body

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Maria devlin
About the Translator: Maria Devlin

Maria Devlin received her Ph.D. in English Literature from Harvard University, where she specialized in Renaissance drama. She has worked as a bibliographical and editorial assistant for The Norton Anthology of English Literature and for The Norton Shakespeare. She is currently working with Stephen Greenblatt to design online courses on Shakespeare, including the modules "Hamlet's Ghost" and "Shylock's Bond" offered through HarvardX. She is writing a book on Renaissance comedy.

Maria Devlin wishes to credit the following sources, which she consulted extensively in composing her translations and annotations:

William Shakespeare. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition. Eds. Gary Taylor et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

William Shakespeare. The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd ed. Eds. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: W.W. Norton& Company, Inc., 2016.