A line-by-line translation

As You Like It

As You Like It Translation Act 5, Scene 1

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Enter TOUCHSTONE and AUDREY

TOUCHSTONE

We shall find a time, Audrey. Patience, gentle Audrey.

TOUCHSTONE

We'll find a time to get married soon, Audrey. Patience, kind Audrey.

AUDREY

Faith, the priest was good enough, for all the old gentleman’s saying.

AUDREY

Honestly, that priest was good enough, despite what the old gentleman said.

TOUCHSTONE

A most wicked Sir Oliver, Audrey, a most vile Martext.But, Audrey, there is a youth here in the forest lays claim to you.

TOUCHSTONE

No, Audrey: he was a wicked Sir Oliver, and a vile Martext. But, Audrey, there is a youth here in the forest who claims that you're his love.

AUDREY

Ay, I know who ’tis. He hath no interest in me in the world.

AUDREY

Yes, I know who that is. He has no claim over me, though.

Enter WILLIAM

Here comes the man you mean.

Here comes the man you mean.

TOUCHSTONE

It is meat and drink to me to see a clown. By my troth, we that have good wits have much to answer for. We shall be flouting. We cannot hold.

TOUCHSTONE

It's like a feast to me to see such a country bumpkin. I swear, we men with good wits have too much responsibility. We have to be mocking. We can't hold our tongues.

WILLIAM

Good ev'n, Audrey.

WILLIAM

Good evening, Audrey.

AUDREY

God gi' good ev'n, William.

AUDREY

God give you a good evening, William.

WILLIAM

And good ev'n to you, sir.

WILLIAM

And good evening to you, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

Good ev'n, gentle friend. Cover thy head, cover thy head.Nay, prithee, be covered. How old are you, friend?

TOUCHSTONE

Good evening, noble friend. No, put your hat back on, put your hat back on. Please, cover your head. How old are you, friend?

WILLIAM

Five-and-twenty, sir.

WILLIAM

Twenty-five, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

A ripe age. Is thy name William?

TOUCHSTONE

A mature age. Is your name William?

WILLIAM

William, sir.

WILLIAM

William, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

A fair name. Wast born i' th' forest here?

TOUCHSTONE

A nice name. Were you born in the forest here?

WILLIAM

Ay, sir, I thank God.

WILLIAM

Yes, sir, thank God.

TOUCHSTONE

“Thank God.” A good answer. Art rich?

TOUCHSTONE

"Thank God"—a good answer. Are you rich?

WILLIAM

'Faith, sir, so-so.

WILLIAM

To be honest, sir, so-so.

TOUCHSTONE

“So-so” is good, very good, very excellent good. And yet it is not: it is but so-so. Art thou wise?

TOUCHSTONE

"So-so" is good, very good, very excellently good. And yet it also isn't: it's only so-so. Are you wise?

WILLIAM

Ay, sir, I have a pretty wit.

WILLIAM

Yes, sir, I have a good mind.

TOUCHSTONE

Why, thou sayst well. I do now remember a saying: “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.” The heathen philosopher, when he had a desire to eat a grape, would open his lips when heput it into his mouth, meaning thereby that grapes weremade to eat and lips to open. You do love this maid?

TOUCHSTONE

Why, you speak well. Which reminds me of a saying: "The fool thinks he is wise, but the wise man knows he is a fool." A classical philosopher, when he wanted to eat a grape, would open his lips and put the grape into his mouth, thereby proving that grapes were made to eat and lips were made to open. Do you love this young lady?

WILLIAM

I do, sir.

WILLIAM

I do, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

Give me your hand. Art thou learned?

TOUCHSTONE

Give me your hand. Are you educated?

WILLIAM

No, sir.

WILLIAM

No, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

Then learn this of me: to have is to have. For it is a figure in rhetoric that drink, being poured out of a cupinto a glass, by filling the one doth empty the other. For all your writers do consent that ipse is “he.” Now, you are not ipse, for I am he.

TOUCHSTONE

Then let me educate you now: to have something is to have it. It's a common figure of speech that when a drink is poured from a cup into a glass, by filling the glass the cup becomes empty. All the authorities agree that ipse translates from the Latin as "he himself." Now, you are not ipse anymore, for I am he.

WILLIAM

Which he, sir?

WILLIAM

Which "he," sir?

TOUCHSTONE

He, sir, that must marry this woman. Therefore, you clown, abandon—which is, in the vulgar, “leave”—the society—which in the boorish is “company”—of this female—which in the common is “woman” ; which together is, abandon the society of this female, or, clown, thou perishest; or, to thy better understanding, diest; or, to wit, I kill thee, make thee away, translate thy life into death, thy liberty into bondage. I will deal in poison with thee, or in bastinado, or in steel. I will bandy with thee in faction. I will o'errun thee with policy. I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways. Therefore tremble and depart.

TOUCHSTONE

"He," sir, who will marry this woman. Therefore, you clown, abandon—which is, in common language, "leave"—the society—which in unsophisticated language means "company"—of this female—which common people would call "woman." All together that makes: abandon the society of this female, or, clown, you'll perish. Or perhaps you'll understand it better if I say "you'll die." Or, rather, I'll kill you; do away with you; transform your life into death and your liberty into captivity. I'll poison you, or beat you with sticks, or stab you. I'll engage in a conflict with you. I'll overwhelm you with cleverness. I will kill you in a hundred and fifty ways. Therefore tremble and depart.

AUDREY

Do, good William.

AUDREY

Do as he says, good William.

WILLIAM

God rest you merry, sir.

WILLIAM

Farewell, sir.

Exit

Enter CORIN

CORIN

Our master and mistress seeks you. Come away, away.

CORIN

Our master and mistress are seeking you. Come on, let's go.

TOUCHSTONE

Trip, Audrey, trip, Audrey.—I attend, I attend.

TOUCHSTONE

Quickly, Audrey, quickly, Audrey.

[To CORIN] I'm coming, I'm coming.

Exeunt

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Matt cosby
About the Translator: Matt Cosby
Matt Cosby graduated from Amherst College in 2011, and currently works as a writer and editor for LitCharts. He is from Florida but now lives in Portland, Oregon, where he also makes art, plays the piano, and goes to dog parks.