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Coriolanus

Coriolanus Translation Act 1, Scene 5

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Enter certain Romans, with spoils

FIRST ROMAN

This will I carry to Rome.

FIRST ROMAN

I'll take this back to Rome.

SECOND ROMAN

And I this.

SECOND ROMAN

And I'll take this.

THIRD ROMAN

A murrain on't! I took this for silver.

THIRD ROMAN

Oh, curse this! I thought this was silver.

Alarum continues still afar off

Enter MARCIUS and TITUS LARTIUS with a trumpet

MARCIUS

See here these movers that do prize their hours At a crack'd drachm! Cushions, leaden spoons, Irons of a doit, doublets that hangmen would Bury with those that wore them, these base slaves, Ere yet the fight be done, pack up: down with them! And hark, what noise the general makes! To him! There is the man of my soul's hate, Aufidius, Piercing our Romans: then, valiant Titus, take Convenient numbers to make good the city; Whilst I, with those that have the spirit, will haste To help Cominius.

MARCIUS

Look at these layabouts, who have no concern for all the time they waste! Cushions, lead spoons, third-rate swords, shirts that no one would ever want—these losers are plundering all of this junk before the fight is even over! To hell with them! But listen, that's Cominius's trumpet! We must go to him! That's where Aufidius, my worst enemy, is fighting against our men. Brave Titus, you stay here with enough men to secure the city, and I'll take whoever is brave enough to hurry to Cominius's aid.

LARTIUS

Worthy sir, thou bleed'st;Thy exercise hath been too violent forA second course of fight.

LARTIUS

But brave sir, you're bleeding! You've already done far too much fighting to turn around and go to another part of the battle.

MARCIUS

Sir, praise me not; My work hath yet not warm'd me: fare you well: The blood I drop is rather physical Than dangerous to me: to Aufidius thus I will appear, and fight.

MARCIUS

Don't call me brave if that's what you'd expect of me. All that fighting has barely warmed me up; goodbye. My bleeding is good for me rather than dangerous. I'll face Aufidius just like this, blood and all. 

LARTIUS

Now the fair goddess, Fortune, Fall deep in love with thee; and her great charms Misguide thy opposers' swords! Bold gentleman, Prosperity be thy page!

LARTIUS

May Lady Luck go with you, and may she turn away the swords of your enemies! Brave soldier, may prosperity walk beside you!

MARCIUS

Thy friend no lessThan those she placeth highest! So, farewell.

MARCIUS

As much prosperity as anyone has ever won! So, goodbye.

LARTIUS

Thou worthiest Marcius!

LARTIUS

That brave Marcius.

Exit MARCIUS

LARTIUS

Go, sound thy trumpet in the market-place;Call thither all the officers o' the town,Where they shall know our mind: away!

LARTIUS

Go, blow your trumpets in the center of the city, and call its leaders together so they can hear what we have to say. Go!

Exeunt

Coriolanus
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