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Coriolanus

Coriolanus Translation Act 4, Scene 2

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Enter SICINIUS, BRUTUS, and an AEdile

SICINIUS

Bid them all home; he's gone, and we'll no further.The nobility are vex'd, whom we see have sidedIn his behalf.

SICINIUS

Tell them all to head home. He's gone, and we're done here. The nobility, who we see have taken his side, are very upset.

BRUTUS

Now we have shown our power,Let us seem humbler after it is doneThan when it was a-doing.

BRUTUS

Now that we've shown them how powerful we are, let's act humbler now that it's done than while we were doing it.

SICINIUS

Bid them home:Say their great enemy is gone, and theyStand in their ancient strength.

SICINIUS

Tell them to go home. Say their great enemy is gone, and they stand as strong as ever.

BRUTUS

Dismiss them home.

BRUTUS

Dismiss them to their homes.

Exit AEdile

BRUTUS

Here comes his mother.

BRUTUS

Here comes his mother.

SICINIUS

Let's not meet her.

SICINIUS

Let's avoid her.

BRUTUS

Why?

BRUTUS

Why?

SICINIUS

They say she's mad.

SICINIUS

They say she's a madwoman.

BRUTUS

They have ta'en note of us: keep on your way.

BRUTUS

They've seen us! Just stay calm.

Enter VOLUMNIA, VIRGILIA, and MENENIUS

VOLUMNIA

O, ye're well met: the hoarded plague o' the godsRequite your love!

VOLUMNIA

Oh, am I glad to see you: may the great plagues of the gods return your love!

MENENIUS

Peace, peace; be not so loud.

MENENIUS

Quiet, quiet, don't be so loud. 

VOLUMNIA

If that I could for weeping, you should hear,—Nay, and you shall hear some. [TO BRUTUS] Will you be gone?

VOLUMNIA

If I just went and wept, you would still hear me—and indeed, you will hear some weeping.

[To BRUTUS]
 Will you get out of here?

VIRGILIA

[To SICINIUS] You shall stay too: I would I had the powerTo say so to my husband.

VIRGILIA

[To SICINIUS] You shall stay—I wish I had the power to say so to my husband.

SICINIUS

Are you mankind?

SICINIUS

Are you women or animals?

VOLUMNIA

Ay, fool; is that a shame? Note but this fool. Was not a man my father? Hadst thou foxship To banish him that struck more blows for Rome Than thou hast spoken words?

VOLUMNIA

Ugh, you fool—is that a problem? Look at this fool. Wasn't my father a man? By what clever betrayal have you banished a man from Rome who struck more blows in our city's service than you have spoken words?

SICINIUS

O blessed heavens!

SICINIUS

Oh, dear god!

VOLUMNIA

More noble blows than ever thou wise words; And for Rome's good. I'll tell thee what; yet go: Nay, but thou shalt stay too: I would my son Were in Arabia, and thy tribe before him, His good sword in his hand.

VOLUMNIA

More noble blows than you've said wise words—and for Rome's good. I'll tell you what: go, go on. No, but you'll stay, won't you? I wish my son were in Arabia, and your whole tribe before him with one good sword in his hand.

SICINIUS

What then?

SICINIUS

What then?

VIRGILIA

What then!He'ld make an end of thy posterity.

VIRGILIA

What then! He'd kill you and all your family.

VOLUMNIA

Bastards and all.Good man, the wounds that he does bear for Rome!

VOLUMNIA

Bastards, all of them. Good man, the wounds that he bears for Rome's sake!

MENENIUS

Come, come, peace.

MENENIUS

Come on, come on, calm down.

SICINIUS

I would he had continued to his countryAs he began, and not unknit himselfThe noble knot he made.

SICINIUS

I wish Coriolanus had continued to serve his country the way he started, and not ruined himself.

BRUTUS

I would he had.

BRUTUS

I wish he had.

VOLUMNIA

'I would he had'! 'Twas you incensed the rabble: Cats, that can judge as fitly of his worth As I can of those mysteries which heaven Will not have earth to know.

VOLUMNIA

"I wish he had!" It was you who started the riot! You are cats, as fit to be the judge of Coriolanus as I am to know the mysteries of heaven which are forbidden to those on earth. 

BRUTUS

Pray, let us go.

BRUTUS

Please, lets go.

VOLUMNIA

Now, pray, sir, get you gone: You have done a brave deed. Ere you go, hear this:— As far as doth the Capitol exceed The meanest house in Rome, so far my son— This lady's husband here, this, do you see— Whom you have banish'd, does exceed you all.

VOLUMNIA

Now, please sir, get out of here. What you've done is brave indeed. Before you go, listen to me. As much as the Capitol is better than the lowliest house in Rome—that's how much my son, this lady's husband here, here, do you see her?—whom you have banished, is better than all of you.

BRUTUS

Well, well, we'll leave you.

BRUTUS

Sure, sure; we'll leave.

SICINIUS

Why stay we to be baitedWith one that wants her wits?

SICINIUS

Why should we stand here to be yelled at by a madwoman?

VOLUMNIA

Take my prayers with you.

VOLUMNIA

[Sarcastically] My prayers go with you.

Exeunt Tribunes

VOLUMNIA

I would the gods had nothing else to do But to confirm my curses! Could I meet 'em But once a-day, it would unclog my heart Of what lies heavy to't.

VOLUMNIA

I wish the gods had nothing else to do but curse them! If I could meet them just once a day, it would clear my heart of all its baggage.

MENENIUS

You have told them home;And, by my troth, you have cause. You'll sup with me?

MENENIUS

You've driven them home. And my god, do you have a good reason to. Will you get dinner with me?

VOLUMNIA

Anger's my meat; I sup upon myself, And so shall starve with feeding. Come, let's go: Leave this faint puling and lament as I do, In anger, Juno-like. Come, come, come.

VOLUMNIA

Anger's my meat; I feed upon myself, and so will starve. Come, lets go. Leave this quiet weeping and grieve the way I do, deep in fury like a god. Come, come, come.

MENENIUS

Fie, fie, fie!

MENENIUS

Damn, damn, damn!

Exeunt

Coriolanus
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