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Henry IV, Part 1

Henry IV, Part 1 Translation Act 3, Scene 1

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Enter HOTSPUR,WORCESTER, Lord MORTIMER, and Owen GLENDOWER

MORTIMER

These promises are fair, the parties sure,And our induction full of prosperous hope.

MORTIMER

These offers of support are good, our allies are reliable, and the beginning of our mission seems very hopeful.

HOTSPUR

Lord Mortimer and cousin Glendower,Will you sit down? And Uncle Worcester—A plague upon it, I have forgot the map.

HOTSPUR

Lord Mortimer and cousin Glendower, won't you sit down? And Uncle Worcester—oh damn it! I forgot to bring the map.

GLENDOWER

No, here it is. Sit, cousin Percy Sit, good cousin Hotspur, for by that name As oft as Lancaster doth speak of you His cheek looks pale and with a rising sigh He wisheth you in heaven.

GLENDOWER

No, here it is. Sit down, cousin Percy, sit down good cousin Hotspur. For that is the name that King Henry normally calls you by, and when he does he grows pale and with a groan, he wishes you were in heaven.

HOTSPUR

And you in hell,As oft as he hears Owen Glendower spoke of.

HOTSPUR

And every time he hears someone speak about Owen Glendower, he wishes that you were in hell.

GLENDOWER

I cannot blame him. At my nativity The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes, Of burning cressets, and at my birth The frame and huge foundation of the earth Shaked like a coward.

GLENDOWER

I can't blame him. When I was born the whole sky was full of fiery comets and meteors, and at my birth, the whole of the earth shook like some kind of coward.

HOTSPUR

Why, so it would have doneAt the same season if your mother’s catHad but kittened, though yourself had never been born.

HOTSPUR

The same thing would have happened if your mother's cat had given birth to kittens that day, whether you had been born or not.

GLENDOWER

I say the earth did shake when I was born.

GLENDOWER

I am telling you that the earth shook when I was born. 

HOTSPUR

And I say the earth was not of my mind,If you suppose as fearing you it shook.

HOTSPUR

And I am saying that if you think the earth shook because it was scared of you, then the earth and I think differently.

GLENDOWER

The heavens were all on fire; the earth did tremble.

GLENDOWER

The sky was on fire, and the earth trembled.

HOTSPUR

O, then the earth shook to see the heavens on fire, And not in fear of your nativity. Diseas—d nature oftentimes breaks forth In strange eruptions; oft the teeming earth Is with a kind of colic pinched and vexed By the imprisoning of unruly wind Within her womb, which, for enlargement striving, Shakes the old beldam earth and topples down Steeples and moss-grown towers. At your birth Our grandam earth, having this distemperature, In passion shook.

HOTSPUR

Oh, then maybe the earth shook because it saw that the sky was on fire, not because it was scared of your birth. When nature is sick, there are often earthquakes. Often the fertile earth is affected and irritated by a pain in her stomach, because she shelters uncontrollable wind within her, which is trying to break free and so shakes the old, grandmother earth and knocks over steeples and moss-covered towers. When you were born, our grandmother earth, feeling this pain, shook in distress. 

GLENDOWER

Cousin, of many men I do not bear these crossings. Give me leave To tell you once again that at my birth The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes, The goats ran from the mountains, and the herds Were strangely clamorous to the frighted fields. These signs have marked me extraordinary, And all the courses of my life do show I am not in the roll of common men. Where is he living, clipped in with the sea That chides the banks of England, Scotland, Wales, Which calls me pupil or hath read to me? And bring him out that is but woman’s son Can trace me in the tedious ways of art And hold me pace in deep experiments.

GLENDOWER

Cousin, I wouldn't take these kinds of insults from many men. Let me tell you once more that when I was born, the sky was full of fiery comets. The goats ran away from the mountains, and the animals in the fields were stamping in fear. These signs have made me an extraordinary man, and everything that has happened to me in my life proves that I should not be considered alongside ordinary men. Is there anyone on this island—anyone that lives in England, Scotland, or Wales—who can claim to be my teacher? Bring out any mortal who can follow me in doing magic and keep up with me in mysterious experiments. 

HOTSPUR

I think there’s no man speaks better Welsh.I’ll to dinner.

HOTSPUR

No man speaks better Welsh than you. I'm going to have lunch. 

MORTIMER

Peace, cousin Percy. You will make him mad.

MORTIMER

Stop now, cousin Percy. You will make him angry. 

GLENDOWER

I can call spirits from the vasty deep.

GLENDOWER

I can summon up spirits from the depths of the ocean. 

HOTSPUR

Why, so can I, or so can any man,But will they come when you do call for them?

HOTSPUR

Well I can, too, and so can any man. The question is, will they come when you call for them?

GLENDOWER

Why, I can teach you, cousin, to command the devil.

GLENDOWER

I can teach you to command the devil. 

HOTSPUR

And I can teach thee, coz, to shame the devil By telling truth. Tell truth and shame the devil. If thou have power to raise him, bring him hither, And I’ll be sworn I have power to shame him hence. O, while you live, tell truth and shame the devil!

HOTSPUR

And I can teach you, pal, how to shame the devil—by telling the truth! "Tell the truth and shame the devil," that's what they say. If you have the power to summon up the devil then do it. I will swear that I have the power to shame him into leaving again. Oh, as long as you're alive, tell the truth and shame the devil!

MORTIMER

Come, come, no more of this unprofitable chat.

MORTIMER

Come on now, let's stop this pointless talking. 

GLENDOWER

Three times hath Henry Bolingbroke made head Against my power; thrice from the banks of Wye And sandy-bottomed Severn have I sent him Bootless home and weather-beaten back.

GLENDOWER

Henry Bolingbroke has taken military action against me three times now.  And three time I have sent him back from the banks of the Wye River and the sandy bottoms of the Severn River, unsuccessful and defeated by the bad weather. 

HOTSPUR

Home without boots, and in foul weather too!How ’scapes he agues, in the devil’s name?

HOTSPUR

You sent him home without boots, and in bad weather, too? How did he avoid getting a fever?

GLENDOWER

Come, here’s the map. Shall we divide our rightAccording to our threefold order ta'en?

GLENDOWER

Come on, here's the map. Should we divide up the land according to our three-way agreement?

MORTIMER

The Archdeacon hath divided it Into three limits very equally: England, from Trent and Severn hitherto, By south and east is to my part assigned; All westward, Wales beyond the Severn shore, And all the fertile land within that bound To Owen Glendower; and, dear coz, to you The remnant northward, lying off from Trent. And our indentures tripartite are drawn, Which being sealèd interchangeably— A business that this night may execute— Tomorrow, cousin Percy, you and I And my good Lord of Worcester will set forth To meet your father and the Scottish power, As is appointed us, at Shrewsbury. My father Glendower is not ready yet, Not shall we need his help these fourteen days. (to GLENDOWER ) Within that space you may have drawn together Your tenants, friends, and neighboring gentlemen.

MORTIMER

The Archdeacon has divided it into three parts very equally. I will take all of England that is south-east of the Trent and Severn Rivers; Owen Glendower, you will take the whole of Wales, and everything that is west of the River Severn, including all of the fertile land in that area. 

[To HOTSPUR] And you, dear cousin, will get everything that is left, north of the River Trent. That is our three-way contract, all drawn up, with our own seals on each copy. We can all sign the agreement tonight.  And then tomorrow, cousin Percy, you, me, and Worcester will set off to meet your father and the Scottish army at Shrewsbury, as we had agreed. My father-in-law Glendower is not ready yet, and we won't need his help for another two weeks. 

[To GLENDOWER] You have that time to build an army of your workers, your friends, and your neighbors. 

GLENDOWER

A shorter time shall send me to you, lords, And in my conduct shall your ladies come, From whom you now must steal and take no leave, For there will be a world of water shed Upon the parting of your wives and you.

GLENDOWER

I will be with you sooner than that, my lords, and I will bring your ladies along with me, and keep them safe. I would advise you to leave now, and don't say goodbye, otherwise they will cry so many tears when you have to go. 

HOTSPUR

Methinks my moiety, north from Burton here, In quantity equals not one of yours. See how this river comes me cranking in And cuts me from the best of all my land A huge half-moon, a monstrous cantle out. I’ll have the current in this place dammed up, And here the smug and silver Trent shall run In a new channel, fair and evenly. It shall not wind with such a deep indent, To rob me of so rich a bottom here.

HOTSPUR

I don't think that my share of the land, everything north of Burton here is equal to your shares. Look how the river bends here, and cuts out a huge semi-circle—a chunk out of some of my best land. I'm going to build a dam, and force the smooth water of the Trent River to go a different way, to run straighter. That way it won't make such an deep cut into my portion of the land, and won't rob me of the fertile river valley.

GLENDOWER

Not wind? It shall, it must. You see it doth.

GLENDOWER

A river not wind? It has to; it must. You can see that it does. 

MORTIMER

Yea, but Mark how he bears his course, and runs me up With like advantage on the other side, Gelding the opposèd continent as much As on the other side it takes from you.

MORTIMER

Yes, but look at how the Trent carries on its journey, and does a similar thing in my section later on, cutting as large a piece out of my side as it does out of yours. 

WORCESTER

Yea, but a little charge will trench him hereAnd on this north side win this cape of land,And then he runs straight and even.

WORCESTER

Yes, but with a little bit of money, you can dig a trench to divert the river, and will get back this bit of land on the north side of the river.  And then it will run straight from then on.

HOTSPUR

I’ll have it so. A little charge will do it.

HOTSPUR

Okay, I can do that. It will only take a little bit of money. 

GLENDOWER

I’ll not have it altered.

GLENDOWER

I don't want the river to be changed.

HOTSPUR

Will not you?

HOTSPUR

Why not?

GLENDOWER

No, nor you shall not.

GLENDOWER

And I won't let you do it. 

HOTSPUR

Who shall say me nay?

HOTSPUR

Oh, are you going to stop me?

GLENDOWER

Why, that will I.

GLENDOWER

Yes, I will. 

HOTSPUR

Let me not understand you, then; speak it in Welsh.

HOTSPUR

Say so in Welsh then, so I don't have to understand what you're saying.

GLENDOWER

I can speak English, lord, as well as you, For I was trained up in the English court, Where being but young I framèd to the harp Many an English ditty lovely well And gave the tongue a helpful ornament— A virtue that was never seen in you.

GLENDOWER

My lord, I can speak English as well as you can. For I was raised in the English court, and when I was young I composed many lovely English songs, and my Welsh gave the lyrics something extra—an achievement you never had. 

HOTSPUR

Marry, And I am glad of it with all my heart: I had rather be a kitten and cry “mew” Than one of these same meter balladmongers. I had rather hear a brazen can’stick turned, Or a dry wheel grate on the axletree, And that would set my teeth nothing an edge, Nothing so much as mincing poetry. 'Tis like the forced gait of a shuffling nag.

HOTSPUR

Indeed, and I am happy about that. I would rather be a kitten and only be able to say, "meow," than be a hawker of ballads! I would rather hear the grating sound of a brass candlestick being smoothed down on a lathe, or an un-oiled wheel scraping against an axle. Nothing puts my teeth on edge more than fussy poetry. It's like the painful steps of an old horse. 

GLENDOWER

Come, you shall have Trent turned.

GLENDOWER

Okay then, you can change the course of the Trent.

HOTSPUR

I do not care. I’ll give thrice so much land To any well-deserving friend; But in the way of bargain, mark you me, I’ll cavil on the ninth part of a hair. Are the indentures drawn? Shall we be gone?

HOTSPUR

I don't care. I would give three times this amount of land to a friend who deserves it. But when I am negotiating about business, I will argue over the tiniest fraction of a hair, that's for sure. Are the agreements drawn up? Are we ready to go?

GLENDOWER

The moon shines fair. You may away by night. I’ll haste the writer, and withal Break with your wives of your departure hence. I am afraid my daughter will run mad, So much she doteth on her Mortimer.

GLENDOWER

The moon is bright, so you can leave tonight. I will tell the man writing up the agreements to hurry, and at the same time, I will break the news to your wives that you are leaving. I am afraid my daughter will go crazy at the news, she loves Mortimer so much. 

Exit GLENDOWER

MORTIMER

Fie, cousin Percy, how you cross my father!

MORTIMER

Damn it, cousin Percy!  You made my father-in-law so annoyed!

HOTSPUR

I cannot choose. Sometime he angers me With telling me of the moldwarp and the ant, Of the dreamer Merlin and his prophecies, And of a dragon and a finless fish, A clip-winged griffin and a moulten raven, A couching lion and a ramping cat, And such a deal of skimble-skamble stuff As puts me from my faith. I tell you what— He held me last night at least nine hours In reckoning up the several devils' names That were his lackeys. I cried “Hum,” and “Well, go to,” But marked him not a word. O, he is as tedious As a tired horse, a railing wife, Worse than a smoky house: I had rather live With cheese and garlic in a windmill, far, Than feed on cates and have him talk to me In any summerhouse in Christendom.

HOTSPUR

I can't help it. Sometimes he makes me angry, when he talks about ridiculous things, like moles and ants. Like that wizard Merlin and his prophecies. A dragon. A fish without fins. A wingless griffin, and a raven with no feathers. A lion lying down, a cat ready to pounce, and so much other nonsensical talk that I don't know what to believe, including my Christian faith! I tell you what—he made me stay awake for at least nine hours last night, telling me the names of various devils that were his attendants. I said, "Hmm," and "Well, do go on," at various moments. But I didn't pay attention to a word he was saying. Oh, he is as boring as a tired horse, or a complaining wife. He's worse than a house filled with smoke! I would rather live in a windmill, and only eat cheese and garlic, than feed on delicacies and have to talk to him in any nice house in the countryside. 

MORTIMER

In faith, he is a worthy gentleman, Exceedingly well read and profited In strange concealments, valiant as a lion, And as wondrous affable, and as bountiful As mines of India. Shall I tell you, cousin? He holds your temper in a high respect And curbs himself even of his natural scope When you come cross his humor. Faith, he does. I warrant you that man is not alive Might so have tempted him as you have done Without the taste of danger and reproof. But do not use it oft, let me entreat you.

MORTIMER

Yet, indeed, he is a very worthy gentleman. He is incredibly well read, and skilled in the occult. He is as courageous as a lion, friendly, and as generous as the mines of India. And you know what, cousin? He greatly respects your character, and restrains himself from getting angry—even though that is his first instinct—when you provoke him. I promise he does. I am telling you that there is not a man alive who could have provoked him like you do without getting a dangerous reaction from him. Don't make a habit of it though—I'm begging you. 

WORCESTER

(to HOTSPUR ) In faith, my lord, you are too willful-blame, And, since your coming hither, have done enough To put him quite beside his patience. You must needs learn, lord, to amend this fault. Though sometimes it show greatness, courage, blood— And that’s the dearest grace it renders you— Yet oftentimes it doth present harsh rage, Defect of manners, want of government, Pride, haughtiness, opinion, and disdain, The least of which, haunting a nobleman, Loseth men’s hearts and leaves behind a stain Upon the beauty of all parts besides, Beguiling them of commendation.

WORCESTER

[To HOTSPUR] Truthfully, my lord, you are wrong to be so stubborn.Ever since you got here, you have done more than enough to test his patience. You should learn to stop doing this as much, my lord. Sometimes it does reveal greatness, courage, and spirit—and that's an advantage for you. Yet, it also demonstrates anger, bad manners, lack of self-control, pride, arrogance, judgment, and hatred. Any of these traits, if they become associated with a nobleman, will make him lose the support of other men.  And they will leave behind a stain on his beautiful accomplishments, cheating him out of praise.

HOTSPUR

Well, I am schooled. Good manners be your speed!Here come our wives, and let us take our leave.

HOTSPUR

Well, I've learned my lesson. May your good manners bring you success! Here come our wives. Let's prepare to leave them.

Enter GLENDOWER with the LADIES PERCY AND MORTIMER

MORTIMER

This is the deadly spite that angers me:My wife can speak no English, I no Welsh.

MORTIMER

This is the awful annoyance that makes me angry—my wife doesn't speak any English, and I don't speak any Welsh. 

GLENDOWER

My daughter weeps; she’ll not part with you.She’ll be a soldier too, she’ll to the wars.

GLENDOWER

My daughter is crying because she doesn't want to be parted from you. She says that she wishes that she was a soldier too, so that she could go to war with you. 

MORTIMER

Good father, tell her that she and my aunt PercyShall follow in your conduct speedily.

MORTIMER

Good father-in-law, tell her that she and my aunt Percy will come along with you very soon. 

GLENDOWER speaks to THE LADY in Welsh, and she answers him in the same

GLENDOWER

She is desperate here, a peevish self-willed harlotry,One that no persuasion can do good upon.

GLENDOWER

She is miserable now, a bad-tempered, headstrong hussy. No-one's going to be able to change that. 

THE LADY speaks again in Welsh

MORTIMER

I understand thy looks. That pretty Welsh Which thou pourest down from these swelling heavens I am too perfect in, and but for shame In such a parley should I answer thee.

MORTIMER

I understand you by looking at your face. I understand only too well those pretty Welsh tears that pour from your heavenly eyes. And I would answer in the same language, if it wasn't shameful for me to cry

THE LADY speaks again in Welsh

I understand thy kisses and thou mine, And that’s a feeling disputation; But I will never be a truant, love, Till I have learned thy language; for thy tongue Makes Welsh as sweet as ditties highly penned, Sung by a fair queen in a summer’s bower, With ravishing division, to her lute.

I understand your kisses, and you understand mine—and that is an emotional conversation. I will never abandon my studies, my love, until I have learned your language. For your tongue makes the Welsh language sound as sweet as the best songs ever written, sung by a beautiful queen in summer's garden, with the lovely accompaniment of her lute. 

GLENDOWER

Nay, if you melt, then will she run mad.

GLENDOWER

Be careful, if you show your feelings too much, you'll make her go crazy. 

THE LADY speaks again in Welsh

MORTIMER

O, I am ignorance itself in this!

MORTIMER

Oh, I have no clue what she's saying!

GLENDOWER

She bids you on the wanton rushes lay you down And rest your gentle head upon her lap, And she will sing the song that pleaseth you And on your eyelids crown the god of sleep, Charming your blood with pleasing heaviness, Making such difference ’twixt wake and sleep As is the difference betwixt day and night The hour before the heavenly harnessed team Begins his golden progress in the east.

GLENDOWER

She asks you to lie down on the floor, covered thick with reeds, and rest your soft head on her lap. She will sing you whichever song you would like to hear until your eyelids droop, and you fall asleep. She will charm you so that you will feel pleasantly heavy, somewhere in between being awake and being asleep—like the change from day to night, that hour before the sun begins its golden journey in the east. 

MORTIMER

With all my heart I’ll sit and hear her sing.By that time will our book, I think, be drawn

MORTIMER

I would love to sit and hear her sing. By the time she's done, our final documents should be ready. 

GLENDOWER

Do so; And those musicians that shall play to you Hang in the air a thousand leagues from hence, And straight they shall be here. Sit, and attend.

GLENDOWER

Please, do. The musicians who are going to play for you are currently hanging in the air about a thousand leagues from here, and will be here very soon. Sit down and wait for them. 

HOTSPUR

Come, Kate, thou art perfect in lying down.Come, quick, quick, that I may lay my head in thy lap.

HOTSPUR

Come on Kate, you are good at lying down. Come on, quick, quick, so that I can rest my head in your lap.

LADY PERCY

Go, you giddy goose.

LADY PERCY

Stop that, you silly goose. 

The music plays

HOTSPUR

Now I perceive the devil understands Welsh,And ’tis no marvel he is so humorous.By 'r Lady, he is a good musician.

HOTSPUR

Now I can see that the devil understands Welsh. It's no wonder he's so unpredictable. By God, he's a good musician. 

LADY PERCY

Then should you be nothing but musical, for you are altogether governed by humors. Lie still, you thief, andhear the lady sing in Welsh.

LADY PERCY

Then it's a wonder you're not more musical, for you are the most unpredictable man there is. Lie still, you thief and listen to the lady singing in Welsh. 

HOTSPUR

I had rather hear Lady, my brach, howl in Irish.

HOTSPUR

I would rather hear my dog Lady howl in Irish.

LADY PERCY

Wouldst thou have thy head broken?

LADY PERCY

Would you like to have your head broken?

HOTSPUR

No.

HOTSPUR

No.

LADY PERCY

Then be still.

LADY PERCY

Then be quiet. 

HOTSPUR

Neither;’tis a woman’s fault.

HOTSPUR

I'll never be quiet—it's women who are meant to be silent

LADY PERCY

Now God help thee!

LADY PERCY

God help you!

HOTSPUR

To the Welsh lady’s bed.

HOTSPUR

Into the Welsh lady's bed. 

LADY PERCY

What’s that?

LADY PERCY

What did you say? 

HOTSPUR

Peace, she sings.

HOTSPUR

Be quiet! She's singing. 

Here THE LADY sings a Welsh song

HOTSPUR

Come, Kate, I’ll have your song too.

HOTSPUR

Come on, Kate—I'd like to hear your song, too. 

LADY PERCY

Not mine, in good sooth.

LADY PERCY

Not mine, darn it. 

HOTSPUR

Not yours, in good sooth! Heart, you swear like a comfit-maker’s wife! “Not you, in good sooth,” and “as true as I live,” and “as God shall mend me,” and “as sure as day”— And givest such sarcenet surety for thy oaths As if thou never walk’st further than Finsbury. Swear me, Kate, like a lady as thou art, A good mouth-filling oath, and leave “in sooth,” And such protest of pepper-gingerbread, To velvet-guards and Sunday citizens. Come, sing.

HOTSPUR

"Not mine, darn it?" Goodness, you swear like a candy-maker's wife! "Not you, darn it." And "I swear on my life," and "God will forgive me," and "as clear as day." Your swearing is as weak as a light silk, you would think that you had never been further than Finsbury. Swear like the lady you are Kate, so that it fills your mouth. Leave out words like "darn it," and outrage at spicy, rude language, that should be left for citizens wearing their Sunday best, trimmed with velvet. Come on, sing for us. 

LADY PERCY

I will not sing.

LADY PERCY

I will not sing. 

HOTSPUR

'Tis the next way to turn tailor, or be red-breast teacher. An the indentures be drawn, I’ll away within these two hours, and so come in when ye will.

HOTSPUR

It's the easiest way to become a tailor, or be a teacher of birds. If our agreements are drawn up, I will leave within the next two hours. Come find me whenever you want. 

Exit HOTSPUR

GLENDOWER

Come, come, Lord Mortimer; you are as slow As hot Lord Percy is on fire to go. By this our book is drawn. We’ll but seal, And then to horse immediately.

GLENDOWER

Come on, Lord Mortimer, you are as reluctant to leave as the eager Lord Percy is burning to go. Our agreements have now been drawn up. We just need to sign them, and then we should leave right after.

MORTIMER

With all my heart.

MORTIMER

I will, with all my heart. 

Exeunt

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Lani strange
About the Translator: Lani Strange

Lani is currently studying for an MA in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and Shakespeare's Globe. She has a BA in English and Latin Literature from the University of Warwick and worked as a Teacher of Drama for a year in between her undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. She has a love for all things theatrical and spends all of her free time either watching theatre or taking part in it herself.